A voice from the tomb. A dialogue between Nelson and Wellington, overheard at St. Paul's

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Page 11 - Conqueror and captive of the earth art thou ! She trembles at thee still, and thy wild name Was ne'er more bruited in men's minds than now That thou art nothing, save the jest of fame, Who...
Page 4 - A chequered red madras upon his head, and his shirt collar open without a cravat. His air was melancholy and troubled. Before him stood a little round table, with some books, at the foot of which lay, in confusion .upon the carpet, a heap of those which he had already perused...
Page 3 - I went out on horseback, and gave every direction to extinguish it. The next morning a violent wind arose, and the fire spread with the greatest rapidity. Some hundred miscreants, hired for that purpose, dispersed themselves in different parts of the town, and, with matches, which they concealed under their cloaks, set fire to as many houses to windward as they could, which was easily done, in consequence of the combustible materials of which they were built. This, together with the violence of the...
Page 11 - To give you an instance of the general feeling in France towards the Bourbons, I will relate to you an anecdote. On my return from Italy, while my carriage was ascending the steep hill of Tarare, I got out and walked up, without any attendants, as was often my custom. My wife and my suite were at a little distance behind me. I saw an old woman, lame, and hobbling about with the help of a crutch, endeavouring to ascend the mountain. I had a great coat on, and was not recognised. I went up to her and...
Page 5 - Enterprize, of which the injustice, perfidy and extravagance had fixed the attention of the World, and which was peculiarly directed against some of the most valuable Interests of the British Empire, has in th» first instance been turned to the confusion of its Authors...
Page 10 - My dear lord, there is an old saying, that when things are at the worst they must mend : now the mind of man cannot fancy things worse than they are here. But, thank God ! my health is better, my mind never firmer, and my heart in the right trim to comfort, relieve, and protect those whom it is my duty to afford assistance to.
Page 6 - when taken prisoner and brought to England, was so much grieved at his defeat, that he studied anatomy on purpose to destroy himself. For this purpose, hi...

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