The Universal Structure of Categories: Towards a Formal Typology

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 24, 2014 - Language Arts & Disciplines
Using data from a variety of languages such as Blackfoot, Halkomelem, and Upper Austrian German, this book explores a range of grammatical categories and constructions, including tense, aspect, subjunctive, case and demonstratives. It presents a new theory of grammatical categories - the Universal Spine Hypothesis - and reinforces generative notions of Universal Grammar while accommodating insights from linguistic typology. In essence, this new theory shows that language-specific categories are built from a small set of universal categories and language-specific units of language. Throughout the book the Universal Spine Hypothesis is compared to two alternative theories - the Universal Base Hypothesis and the No Base Hypothesis. This valuable addition to the field will be welcomed by graduate students and researchers in linguistics.
 

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Contents

The universal structure of categories
1
1 Multifunctionality as homophony page
4
4 Direct mapping between a UoL and interpretation
10
5 κ mediates the relation between a UoL and
27
7 Universal categories as prototypes
34
A history of ideas behind the spine
39
1 The base and the transformational component
80
The universal spine as a heuristic for the identification
84
1 Blackfoot clausetypes
175
Nominal anchoring categories
188
Categories that introduce a point of view
249
1 Blackfoot verbal template
261
2 Blackfoot verbal template
285
Towards a formal typology
299
1 The universal structure of categories and their
310
4 κ mediates between UoL and its interpretation
324

Anchoring categories in independent clauses
98
1 Blackfoot verbal template
119
3 Halkomelem clausetypes
128
Anchoring categories in dependent clauses
145

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About the author (2014)

Martina Wiltschko is an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of British Columbia.

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