Curiosities of Literature, Volume 3

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Lilly, Wait, Colman and Holden, 1833 - Literature

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Page 19 - The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed today, Had he thy reason, would he skip and play? Pleased to the last, he crops the flowery food, And licks the hand just raised to shed his blood.
Page 26 - ... human, angel, man, Beast, bird, fish, insect, what no eye can see, No glass can reach; from Infinite to thee, From thee to nothing. On superior...
Page 116 - ... and yet I was not seen; My thread is cut, and yet it is not spun; And now I live, and now my life is done! I sought my death, and found it in my womb; I looked for life, and saw it was a shade; I trod the earth, and knew it was my tomb; And now I die, and now I am but made; The glass is full, and now my glass is run; And now I live, and now my life is done!
Page 30 - Two such I saw what time the laboured ox In his loose traces from the furrow came, And the swinkt hedger at his supper sat...
Page 12 - Far, far aloof th' affrighted ravens sail ; The famish'd eagle screams, and passes by. Dear lost companions of my tuneful art, Dear as the light that visits these sad eyes, Dear as the ruddy drops that warm my heart, Ye died amidst your dying country's cries — No more I weep.
Page 31 - Under an oak, whose antique root peeps out Upon the brook that brawls along this wood : To the which place a poor ^sequester'd stag, That from the hunter's aim had ta'en a hurt...
Page 16 - Full many a gem of purest ray serene The dark unfathom'd caves of ocean bear : Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its sweetness on the desert air. Some village- Hampden, that, with dauntless breast, The little tyrant of his fields withstood, Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest, Some Cromwell guiltless of his country's blood. Th...
Page 71 - I knew a very wise man that believed that if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 178 - It cannot be denied, but that he who is made judge to sit upon the birth or death of books, whether they may be wafted into this world or not, had need to be a man above the common measure, both studious, learned and judicious...
Page 26 - My fortune leads to traverse realms alone, And find no spot of all the world my own. E'en now, where Alpine solitudes ascend, I sit me down a pensive hour to spend...

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