The Life of Samuel Johnson: LL. D. Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides

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John Murray, 1844
 

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Page 81 - ... be some degree of care and anxiety. The master of the house is anxious to entertain his guests; the guests are anxious to be agreeable to him: and no man, but a very impudent dog indeed, can as freely command what is in another man's house, as if it were his own. Whereas, at a tavern, there is a general freedom from anxiety. You are sure you are welcome: and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcomer you are. No...
Page 309 - Depend upon it, Sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.
Page 209 - Sir Joshua agreed to carry it to Dr. Johnson, who received it with much good humour245, and desired Sir Joshua to tell the gentlemen, that he would alter the Epitaph in any manner they pleased, as to the sense of it; but he would never consent to disgrace the walls of Westminster Abbey with an English inscription.
Page 118 - Depend upon it, Sir, this is not true. A woman of fortune being used to the handling of money, spends it judiciously: but a woman who gets the command of money for the first time upon her marriage, has such a gust in spending it, that she throws it away with great profusion.
Page 187 - I therefore, while we were sitting quietly by ourselves at his house in an evening, took occasion to open my plan thus : — 'Mr. Dilly, Sir, sends his respectful compliments to you, and would be happy if you would do him the honour to dine with him on Wednesday next along with me, as I must soon go to Scotland.
Page 246 - Th' oblivious grave's inviolable shade. Let one great payment every claim appease, And him who cannot hurt, allow to please ; To please by scenes, unconscious of offence, By harmless merriment or useful sense. Where aught of bright or fair the piece displays, Approve it only — 'tis too late to praise. If want of skill or want of care appear, Forbear to hiss; — the poet cannot hear. By all, like him, must praise and blame be found, At last a fleeting gleam, or empty sound.
Page 225 - ALMIGHTY God, who alone canst order the unruly wills and affections of sinful men ; Grant unto thy people, that they may love the thing which thou commandest, and desire that which thou dost promise ; that so, among the sundry and manifold changes of the world, our hearts may surely there be fixed, where true joys are to be found ; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Page 178 - Many things which are false are transmitted from book to book, and gain credit in the world. One of these is the cry against the evil of luxury. Now the truth is, that luxury produces much good. Take the luxury of buildings in London.
Page 82 - As soon (said he) as I enter the door of a tavern, I experience an oblivion of care, and a freedom from solicitude : when I am seated, I find the master courteous, and the servants obsequious to my call; anxious to know and ready to supply my wants : wine there exhilarates my spirits, and prompts me to free conversation and an interchange of discourse with those whom I most love : I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinion and sentiments I find delight.
Page 299 - Wearing out life's evening gray : * Smite thy bosom, sage, and tell, * What is bliss ? and which the way ? " BOSWELL. " But why smite his bosom, Sir !" JOHNSON. "Why to shew he was in earnest,

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