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Selection from “ The Ode for the

Self-Portraiture :

King's Birthday, 1792,'

I. From “Poet's Epitaph,"

• 194

Selection from " The Ode for the

II.“ How Pure His Spirit,"

195

Year

146 III. - For I Would Walk Alone,"

Birthday Ode Yor the Year 1800, 147

195

IV. “There Was a Boy,"

• 195

Selection from “ Naucratia,

V. Personal Talk,

196

Naval Dominion,"

Shooting,

148 Poems Relating to Wordsworth's Mis-

From "Alfred,"

148

sion, the Growth of His Mind, the

ROBERT SOUTHEY,

Subjects of His l'erse :

151

1. “Fair Seed-time Had my Soul," 197

SELECTIONS FROM SOUTHEY:

II. “ For the Man, Who in this

Selection from "Carmen Trium-

Spirit,"

• 199

phale,”.

200

III. “ Ye Presences of Nature,"

157

Selections from “ Ode written dur-

IV. “On Man, on Nature," .

ing the Negociations with Buona-

V. “Here Might I Pause,

203

parte, in January, 1814,'

VI. “ The Hemisphere of Magic

157

Selections from “ Funeral Song."

Fiction,"

. 159

203

Selections from " Ode Written Dur.

VII. “ Thus From a Very Early

ing the War with America," 1814, 162

Age,"

The Spanish Armada,

163

VIII. First Perception of words:

Remembrance,

164

worth's Mission,

204

Roderick in Battle,

166

IX. “ What Want We?"

The Curse,

167

X. "(I Have) Sate Among the

The Swerga,

167

Woods,

205

From “ Kehama,"

169

XI. “ (I)

Would Speak,

206

From " Kehama,''

XII. - I Felt What Independent

169

From “ Thalaba,''

Solaces,"

206

170

From Madoc,''

XIII. "Call Ye These Appearances,

• 170

207

The Source of the Ganges,

XIV. “ Were I Grossly Destitute,”. 207

170

The Sea, .

XV. " What we Have Loved," 208

. 171

Impulse,

171

Freedom of the Will,

The Lucy Poems :

171

The Ebb-Tide,

I. “Strange Fits of Passion,"

171

The Dead Friend,

II. “She Dwelt Among the Un-

172

Inscription,

trodden Ways,"

173

209

From The Rose,"

III. “ I Travelled Among Unknown

174

The Traveller's Return,

Men,"

209

174

The Old Man's Comforts and How

IV. “ Three Years She Grew,"

He Gained Them,

V. “ A Slumber,"

175

From "The Devil's 'Walk,"

• 175

The Battle of Blenheim,

Some Poems Relating to Mrs. Words-

176

The Well of St. Keyne,

worth :

• 177

The Cataract of Lodore,

1. “A Farewell,"

179

The Inchcape Rock,

182

II. “She was a' Phantom of De:

Stanzas Written in my Library, 184

light,"

213

Epitaph,

184

III. "Thereafter Came One."

• 214

To Mary Wolstonecraft,

185

IV. “By Her Exulting Outside Look

of Youth,"

• 214

Seletions from the Sonnets :

V. “O Dearer Far,"

214

1. “ Fair is the Rising Morn." 185

Some Poems Relating to Dorothy

11. “ How Darkly n'er Yon Far-off

Hord's tvorth:

Mountain."

I. Choice of the Home at Gras-

III. "O Thou Sweet Lark!”

IV. “Thou Lingerest, Spring,”

mere,

186

V. “As Thus I Stand,'

II. " Mine Eyes Did Neer,"

187

III. "Child of My Parents,

Sonnet to the Evening Rainbow, . 187 IV. From “The Sparrow's Nest," 216

V. "I was Blest,

• 217

William WordswORTH,

188

VI. “Such Thraldom,"

• 217

VIL To my Sister,

SelecTIONS FROM WORDSWORTH :

VIJI. Toa Butterfly,

The Poet Laureate,

193 IX. To a Butterfly,

219

The Poet,

193

X. Nutting,

• 219

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232

260
260
261
262
264
265

266

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267

Some Ballads, Narratives and Pas-

torals:

.

PAGE

Lines Composed a Few Miles

Above Tintern Abbey,

Ode on Ineimations of I'mmortality, 224

Composed upon an Evening of

Extraordinary Splendour and

Beauty,

. 230

From The Excursion":

J. Description of Mist Opening in

the Hills, .

II The Soul's Perception,

233

III. Power of the Soul,

234

Stray Lines from “The Excursion," 235

Character of the Happy Warrior, 236

Ode to Duty,

Elegiac Stanzas,

.240

Lines Composed at Grasmere, 241

Selections from The Sonnets :

1. "Scorn Not the Sonnet," 242

II. * Great Men Have Been

Among Us,"

243

111. “It Is Not to be Thought

of."

243

IV. Composed by the Sea-side,

Near Calais, August,

1802,

243

V. September, 1802,

244

VI. Written in London, Sep-

tember, 1802,

244

VII. London, 1802,

245

VIII.“ England! The Time is

Come,"

245

IX. Thoughi of a Briton, on the

Subjugation of Switzer-

land,

245

x. To Touissant L'Ouverture, 216

XI. To B. R. Haydon,

XII. - The World is too Much

with Us,"

• 247

XIII. Composed upon

Westmin:

ster Bridge,

• 247

XIV. “It is a Beauteous Even-

ing,"

247

XV. "The Shepherd Looking

Eastward,'

XVI. To the Supreme Being,

XVII. "Most Sweet It Is,'

• 249

XVIIL “Where Lies the Land," . 249

XIX." Her Only Pilot," • 249

XX. To Sleep,

250

XXI. “I Watch, and Long Have

Watched,'

250

XXII. Mu ability,

XXIII. Inside of 'King's College

Chapel, Cambridge,

257

XXIV. The Same,

251

XXV. The Same,

252

XXVI. After-thought,

252

XXVII. The Trossachs,

253

XXVIII, Highland Hut,

253

XXIX. On the Departure of Sir

Walter Scott from Ab-

botsford for Naples,

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410
410

PAGE

Stray Selections :

VI. - One Writes,"

401

1. To a Child,

VII.“ Dark House,"

333

402

11. "My Heart Leaps Up," ·

VIII. " A Happy Lover,"

• 333

403

III. To á Young Lady,

IX. “Fair Ship.".

403

IV. From ** The Tables Turned, **

X. “I Hear the Noise,".

334

404

V. From "Expostulation and

XI. “Calm is the Morn,"

405

Reply,".

XIX. "The Danube,'

334

405

VI. To Lady Fleming, .

XXIV. “And Was the Day,"

• 335

VII. Song for the Spinning Wheel, 335

XXXIV. “My Own Dim Lite,'

UI. A Night Piece,

XL, "Could We Forget,'

IX. The Moon,

LI. “Do We Indeed Desire,"

X. The Echo,

LIV. "Oh Yeu We Trust,"

337

LV. " The Wish,"

Stray Lines from Different Poems, 337 LXII. “Tho' is an Eye."

Stray Beauties from "The Pre-

409

lude,

LXIV.“ Dost Thou Look Back,'

344

Selection from The Ode on Prince

XCIV. “How l'ure at Heart,

XCVI. “You Say."

Albert,"

CVIII. "I Will Not Shut Me from

My Kind,"

ALFRED TENNYSON,

• 349

CXIII. * * Lis Held that Sorrow,

SELECTIONS FROM TENNYSON:

CXIV. “Who Loves not knowl-

edge,”

• 412

To the Queen,

• 351

CXV. “Now Fades,”

The Poet,

413

CXIT. “Is It, then, Regret," 414

Poland,

• 353

CXXIV. “That Which We Dare In-

From "The Two Voices,"

voke,

414

The Miller's Daughter, · 354 CXXXI. “O Living Will,"

The Palace of Art,

415

The Lotos-Eaters,

Stray Lines from “ In Memoriam," 415

From " Lines to J. S.,"

370

From “ Love Thou Thy Land,"

Selections from Maud":

• 370

Love and Duty,

“We are Puppets,"

417

Ulysses,

• 372 “ A Voice by the Cedar Tree.'s

417

Locksley Hall,

• 374

** Whom but Maud

Should i

St. Agnes' Eve,

381

Meer,

Sir Launcelot and Queen Guine: “ Birds in the High Hall.garden,"

419

vere,

"Go not, Happy Day."

The Eagle,

383

* I Have Led Her Home,”

"Come Not When I Am Dead,” 384 1. "Come into the Garden, Maud," 420

** Move Eastward,"

384

“ Break, Break, Break,"

384 Selections from "Idylls of the king":

Selection from The Princess," 385

I. Dedication,

423

Songs from the " Princess":

II. Songs from “Gareth and Lyn-

ette,'

424

1. “As Through the Land,"

387

III. Selection 'from-

" Enid' and

II. * Sweet and Low."

Geraint,"

425

INI. “The Splendour Falls,".

IV. Stray Lines from Enid and

IV. "Tears, Idle Tears,"

Geraint,

V. “O Swallow, Swallow,”

389

V. Song

from

i Merlin and

VI. “Thy Voice is Heard,''

390

Vivien,'

• 427

VII. Home they Brought Her VI. Song from Lancelot' and

Warrior,"

390

Elaine,"

427

VIII. "Ask Me 'no More,";

VII. Stray Lines from "Lancelei

• 391

Ode on the Death of the Duke of

and Elaine,

Wellington,

VIII. Songs from The Last Tourna:

The Higher Pantheism,

398

ment,"

**Flower in the Crannied Wall,” IX. Song from · Guinevere, ".

• 399

X. The Farewell of Arthur, • 429

Selections from In Memoriam", To Alfred Tennyson,

• 433

** Strong Son of God,"

309

Rizpah,

• 433

1. " 1 Held it Truth,”.

400 Dedicatory Poem to the Princess

IV.“ To Sleep I Give my Powers,

Alice,

V. “I Sometimes Hold it Half a De Profundis,

Sin,

• 401 Songs from **The Ancient sage, " 439

382

419
420

• 388

388
· 389

426

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PREFATORY NOTE.

These biographical sketches and critical estimates of the laureates (especially in the case of Southey, Wordsworth, and Tennyson, whose genius has evoked a whole literature of analytic criticism) are necessarily fragmentary and brief, designed merely to stimulate detailed study. Such study would be fruitful of much delight as well as include a survey of many momentous historical and literary events, and furnish glimpses of a large number of famous men whose lives touched directly or remotely those of the poets laureate.

As the field is so wide, the task of making these selections from the fourteen laureates has been difficult, not only because the works of several of them are buried in out-of-the-way and forgotten places, but because in many cases the flowers of poetry have had to be plucked from a mass of coarse or noxious weeds. For this valuable aid in our work we are indebted to Miss Josie Russell, who, in the selections, has shown taste and critical judgment as well as industry. She has not attempted to give the strictly official poems of these poets laureate, but to, as far as possible, furnish examples of their lyrical genius. In cases where their official poems are representative of their genius they are of course included. A complete collection of these official odes of the laureates would be of unique value and interest, though it would exclude the work of the greatest poet among them all. After Wordsworth's acceptance of the laurel he wrote nothing official except a tine ode on the installation of Prince Albert as Chancellor of the University of Cambridge.

The Introduction dealing with the origin and significance of the Laureateship appeared originally in The Century Magazine ; and is here reproduced by kind permission of the publishers.

Statistics are not always entertaining reading, but they are essential for accuracy, and nowhere more essential than in the discussion of this subject of the Laureateship of England; as so much has been written upon it which is misleading. Many journalists, in wishing to present to the public the outlines of a “ timely subject,” read hurriedly a few "authorities,” not waiting to investigate whether these be reliable; they do not weigh

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