A critical pronouncing dictionary. With a suppl., by E. Smith

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Page 10 - For pronunciation the best general rule is, to consider those as the most elegant speakers who deviate least from the written words.
Page 14 - English manner ; but upon the publication of this nobleman's letters, which was about twenty years after he wrote them, his authority has had so much influence with the polite world as to bid fair for restoring the...
Page 3 - The definition of a vowel, as little liable to exception as any, seems to be the following : A vowel is a simple sound formed by a continued effusion of the breath, and a certain conformation of the mouth, without any alteration...
Page 169 - A great circle, whose poles are the poles of the •world. It divides the globe into two equal parts, the northern and southern hemispheres.
Page 14 - But it was so far from having generally obtained, that Lord Chesterfield strictly enjoins his son to avoid this pronunciation as affected. In a few years, however, it became so general, that none but the lowest vulgar ever pronounced it in the English manner ; but upon the publication of this nobleman's letters, which was about twenty years after he wrote them, his authority has...
Page 268 - Insects, which in their several changes belong to several of the before-mentioned divisions, may be considered together as one great tribe of animals. They are called insects, from a separation in the middle of their bodies, whereby they are, as it were, cut into two parts, which are joined together by a small ligature; as we see in wasps, common flies, and the like.

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