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SERMON I.

THE CONSTRAINING INFLUENCE OF

CHRIST'S LOVE.

2 CORINTHIANS v. 14-17,

For the love of Christ constraineth us, be

cause we thus judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead: and that he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them and rose again. Wherefore henceforth know we no man after the flesh : yea, though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we him no more. VOL, II.

2

Therefore if any man be in Christ, he
is a new creature: old things are

passed away ; behold, all things are 21-5?7 become new

1

Festus, the Roman governor, when Paul
defended himself against the charges of his
enemies, said unto him“ with a loud voice,
“ Paul, thou art beside thyself; much learn-

ing doth make thee mad.” In reply“ he
" said, I am not mad, most noble Festus; but

speak forth the words of truth and sober“ ness”.” The great apostle of the Gentiles spake what he knew, and testified what he had seen.

Because he was not deceived himself, he could not deceive others. His testimony, however, though it could not be disproved, was rejected. The Roman governor descended to the use of invectiveof calumny--of ridicule. Similar views and feelings influenced certain persons in the Corinthian Church, to exhibit Paul as a weak zealot. His spotless integrity, his disinterested activity, repelled the suspicion of fraud. They therefore charged him with being beside himself.” He acted so con

b Acts xxvi. 24, 25.

SUS.

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trary to the principles of worldly wisdom, that there appeared some plausibility in the charge. But the moment he speaks and unfolds the motives of his conduct, that plausibility vanishes. We look for it, and wonder what it was, that for a moment made it in the least credible amongst professors of Je

“ The love of Christ,” saith he meekly, in answer to the malice of his foes, 66 straineth us,

because we thus judge, that if “ one died for all, then were all dead : and 66 that he died for all, that they which live 66 should not henceforth live unto them

selves, but unto him which died for them “ and rose again. Wherefore henceforth “ know we no man after the flesh: yea,

though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we him

Therefore if any man be in “ Christ, he is a new creature: old things

are passed away ; behold, all things are be

come new.” Thus, by manifestation of the truth, he commended himself, not only to the understanding, but to the conscience of every man in the sight of God. The appeal which he makes is irresistible, for the reason which he offers is irrefutable.

no more.

The love of Christ was the spring which set in motion all his affections, and gave rise to those astonishing displays which he exhibited of almost every virtue.

This spring operated in the hearts of the other apostles, and still operates in the heart of every sincere minister. The love of Christ is the burden of his exhortations, as well as the principal motive which he offers for holy living. Every Christian feels this motive; it destroys selfishness; it produces holiness. It is the grand principle of a new life; of a life of religion, and of the purest morals.

The Gospel ministry which dwells much on this love, is not unfrequently blamed, as tending to loosen our obligations to morality. So far is this from the fact, that, on the contrary, a Gospel ministry, which loses sight of this love, or does not enlarge on it, and often bring it into view, really injures the interests of morality. The love of Christ is the great and truly constraining motive to the exercise of all those virtues which, whilst they meliorate the state of man, adorn and dignify his character. In this view, as completely justifying the importance attached to it by a Gospel

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