Philosophical Magazine: A Journal of Theoretical, Experimental and Applied Physics

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis., 1867 - Physics
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Rev S Haughton on the Wavelengths of the Transmis
118
Mr Ž Forbess Researches on the Mineralogy of South Ame
131
P Schützenberger on the Substitution of the Metal in a Salt
140
Proceedings of the Geological Society
153
On an arrangement for the Graphical Representation of Curves
159
D Heath on the Dynamical Theory of Deepsea Tides
165
Dr Atkinsons Chemical Notices from Foreign Journals
187
Brooke on Negative Fluid Pressure on a given Surface
207
FEBRUARY
210
Mr J Croll on the Reason why the Difference of reading
213
The Rev J Hunters Modern
223
Proceedings of the Geological Society
233
On the Application of the Tuningfork to Horology by M
240
What changes can be made in the arrange
261
G van der Mensbrugghe on the Tension of Liquid Films
270
Mr G Forbes on the Meteoric Shower of November 1866
282
Mr W F Barrett on Sensitive Flames 216
289
Proceedings of the Royal Society
304
Proceedings of the Geological Society
315
Mr F C Webb on one of Ohms Laws relating to an Insu
321
Dr W von Bezold on Binocular Vision
327
Dr Hows Contributions to the Mineralogy of Nova Scotia
336
Sir David Brewsters Additional Observations on the Polariza
346
Mr A Ransome on some of the Conditions of Molecular Action
360
Prof Tyndall on the Action of Sonorous Vibrations on Gaseous
375
Proceedings of the Royal Society
391
On the BritishAssociation Unit for Electrical Measurements
397
Mr G Forbes on the Meteoric Shower of the 14th of Novem
401
Prof Magnus on the Influence of the Adhesion of Vapour
417
Prof Tyndalls Note on the preceding Paper
425
Archdeacon Pratt on the Problem on Attractions in the Philo
445
J M Gaugain on Groves GasBattery
465
On the Disengagement of Gases from their saturated Solutions
479
Sir David Brewsters Additional Observations on the Polarization
565
JULY 1867
17
Archdeacon Pratt on Professor Stokess Proof of Clairauts
25
Dr Atkinsons Chemical Notices from Foreign Journals
34
Illustrative of Mr G Forbess Paper on the Meteoric Shower
49
Messrs J A Wanklyn and R R F Davey on Sir Benjamin
50
Mr W Elliss Inquiry as to whether the tendency to Dispersion
61
Proceedings of the Geological Society
67
On the Spectrum of Mars with some Remarks on the Colour
74
AUGUST
81
Dr J C Draper on an Apparatus for the Detection of Adulte
104
Mr J Croll on the Change in the Obliquity of the Ecliptic
127
Tomlinson on the socalled Inactive Condition
136
Mr J P Harrison on the Moons Influence over Cloud 143
143
Some Observations on Glass Tears by E Reusch 166
166
Prof J D Dana on a Connexion between Crystalline Form
178
The Rev J B Harbord on the Conic Theory of Heat con
185
G Van der Mensbrugghe on the Tension of Liquid Films 192
192
Sir David Brewster on the Radiant Spectrum 202
202
Mr W Ellis on the Influence of the Full Moon on Cloud 218
218
Tomlinson on the socalled Inactive Condition
229
On a Photometer for Measuring the Transparence of the Air
241
249
267
Mr J Douglas on the Source of Muscular Force 273
273
Dr Rankine on the Approximate Drawing of Circular Arcs
284
Prof Lielegg on the Spectrum of the Bessemerflame 302
303
Proceedings of the Geological Society
317
Mr G J Stoney on the Solar Eclipse August 1868 502
502
Mr T Gaffield on the Action of Sunlight on Glass 514
515
Prof J C Poggendorff on a new Electrical Phenomenon
533
Proceedings of the Geological Society
546
On the Polarization of the Electrodes by M J M Gaugain 553
553
Mr G Clark on the Geological Features of Mauritius 555
555

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 500 - Thus the law of universal attraction becomes pure Metaphysics if we withdraw from it the verifiable specification of its mode of operation. Withdraw the formula " inversely as the square of the distance and directly as the mass," and Attraction is left standing a mere
Page 529 - The conclusions he had thus been able to arrive at are the following : — (1) That the surface of the chalk in the Valley of the Somme had assumed its present form prior to the deposition of any of the gravel or loess...
Page 2 - ... the highest temperatures to which it is likely to be exposed even under very exceptional climatic conditions. The only influences which the addition of that amount of carbonate to gun-cotton might exert upon its properties as an explosive would consist in a trifling addition to the small amount of smoke attending its combustion, and in a slight retardation of its explosion, neither of which could be regarded as results detrimental to the probable value of the material.
Page 110 - The creaking of my boots sets it in violent commotion. The crumpling or tearing of a bit of paper, or the rustle of a silk dress, does the same. It is startled by the patter of a rain-drop.
Page 461 - Nothing can give a notion of the charm which he imparted to these improvised lectures, in which he knew how to combine animated and often eloquent language with a judgment and art in his experiments which added to the clearness and elegance of his exposition. He exerted an actual fascination upon his auditors ; and when, after having initiated them into the mysteries of science, he terminated his lecture, as he was in the habit of doing, by rising into regions far above matter, space, and time, the...
Page 140 - Were it not for the ice, the summers of North Greenland, owing to the continuance of the sun above the horizon, would be as warm as those of England ; but, instead of this, tho » Tyndall, " On Heat,
Page 283 - Lenarto has no doubt come from such an atmosphere, in which hydrogen greatly prevailed. This meteorite may be looked upon as holding imprisoned within it, and bearing to us, the hydrogen of the stars.
Page 368 - U-tube, one metre in length, whose sides were moistened internally with water, while the tube itself was cooled by being immersed in a vessel of cold water. On passing atmospheric air in a favourable state through this apparatus, at the rate of three litres per minute, the test-paper was distinctly tinged in two or three minutes, provided no heat was applied to the glass globe. But when the temperature of the air, as it passed through the globe, was maintained at 260° C., not the slightest action...
Page 458 - ... Europe. They prove to us that we could not by any re-arrangement of the relative positions of land and water produce for the northern hemisphere a climate which would explain the phenomena in a satisfactory manner. We must," he continues, "admit that we are face to face with a problem whose solution in all probability must be attempted, and, we doubt not, completed by the astronomer.
Page 403 - I observed that the flame of the last-mentioned burner exhibited pulsations in height which were exactly synchronous with the audible beats. This phenomenon was very striking to every one in the room, and especially so when the strong notes of the violoncello came in. It was exceedingly interesting to observe how perfectly even the trills of this instrument were reflected on the sheet of flame. A deaf man might have seen the harmony.

Bibliographic information