The Video Game Theory Reader 2

Front Cover
Bernard Perron, Mark J.P. Wolf
Routledge, Nov 19, 2008 - Games & Activities - 456 pages

The Video Game Theory Reader 2 picks up where the first Video Game Theory Reader (Routledge, 2003) left off, with a group of leading scholars turning their attention to next-generation platforms-the Nintendo Wii, the PlayStation 3, the Xbox 360-and to new issues in the rapidly expanding field of video games studies. The contributors are some of the most renowned scholars working on video games today including Henry Jenkins, Jesper Juul, Eric Zimmerman, and Mia Consalvo. While the first volume had a strong focus on early video games, this volume also addresses more contemporary issues such as convergence and MMORPGs. The volume concludes with an appendix of nearly 40 ideas and concepts from a variety of theories and disciplines that have been usefully and insightfully applied to the study of video games.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Game Design as a Model for Literacy in the TwentyFirst Century
23
Chapter 2 Philosophical Game Design
33
Play as Form
45
Chapter 4 Embodiment and Interface
65
Chapter 5 Understanding Video Games as Emotional Experiences
85
The Circles of Gameplay
109
Chapter 7 Understanding Digital Playability
133
Media Convergence and SelfDefeating Adaptations
213
The Many Meanings of Difficulty in Video Games
237
The GAMBIT Experience
253
Chapter 14 Synthetic Worlds as Experimental Instruments
273
Theorizing Noise in Online Game Spaces
295
Doing Multidisciplinary Game Studies
313
Video Games through Theories and Disciplines
331
Bibliography
389

Chapter 8 Zaxis Development in the Video Game
151
LaMulana an 8Bit Period Piece
169
Early Video Games and Television in the Emergence of the Personal Computer
197
About the Contributors
401
Index
417
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Mark J. P. Wolf is an Associate Professor in the Communication Department at Concordia University Wisconsin. His books include Abstracting Reality: Art, Communication, and Cognition in the Digital Age (2000), The Medium of the Video Game (2001), Virtual Morality: Morals, Ethics, and New Media (2003), The Video Game Theory Reader (2003), The World of the D'ni: Myst and Riven (2006), The Video Game Explosion: A History from PONG to PlayStation and Beyond (2007), and J. R. R. Tolkien: Of Words and Worlds (forthcoming, 2009).

Bernard Perron is an Associate Professor of Cinema at the University of Montreal. He has co-edited The Video Game Theory Reader (2003), written Silent Hill: il motore del terrore (2006), an analysis of the Silent Hill videogame series, and is editing Gaming After Dark: Essays on Horror Video Games (forthcoming, 2009).

Bibliographic information