Blind Memory: Visual Representations of Slavery in England and America, 1780-1865

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Manchester University Press, 2000 - Art, American - 341 pages
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A study of Atlantic slavery generated by the visual arts. It considers in detail four sites which have generated particularly influential imagery: the middle passage; flight/escape; slave torture/punishment; and the popular imagery which evolved around Stowe's classic abolition text, Uncle Tom's Cabin.
 

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Blind memory: visual representations of slavery in England and America, 1780-1865

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This is an erudite yet remarkably engaging examination of the visual representation of slavery in Europe and North America in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Wood (English, Sussex Univ., UK ... Read full review

Blind memory: visual representations of slavery in England and America, 1780-1865

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This is an erudite yet remarkably engaging examination of the visual representation of slavery in Europe and North America in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Wood (English, Sussex Univ., UK ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The irrecoverable representing the middle passage
14
Rhetoric and the runaway the iconography of slave escape in England and America
78
Beyond the cover Uncle Toms Cabin and slavery as global entertainment
143
Representing pain and describing torture slavery punishment and martyrology
215
Conclusion
292
Bibliography
309
Index
333
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