Falstaff: Being the Acta Domini Johannis Fastolfe, Or Life and Valiant Deeds of Sir John Faustoff, Or The Hundred Days War, as Told by Sir John Fastolf, K. G., to His Secretaries, William Worcester, Stephen Scrope, Fr Brackley, Christopher Hanson, Luke Nanton, John Bussard, and Peter Basset

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Robert Nye
Arcade Publishing, 2001 - Fiction - 450 pages
Irascible and still lecherous at age 81, Sir John Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's greatest characters, spins out these memoirs as an antidote to legend, and in so doing manages to recreate his own. Set in an England that was ribald, violent, superstitious, and brimming with a new sense of national purpose, "Falstaff" brings to life not only the man himself but the whole Elizabethan era, from the viewpoint of one of its major players. Here we see what history and the Bard overlooked or purposely left out: what really happened that celebrated night when Falstaff and Justice Shallow heard the chimes at midnight; who killed Hotspur; how many men really fell at Agincourt; what actually transpired at the coronation of Henry V ("Harry the Prig") and much, much more!
 

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Contents

About the begetting of Sir John Fastolf I
1
About a genealogy refused
6
About the birth of Sir John Fastolf
14
About the games of Sir John Fastolf when he was young
20
About the tutor Ravenstone the whip
24
About Sir John Fastolfs mother the amorous vision
28
About Pope Joan Mary Fastolfs tale
29
About the Duke of Hell
32
About correspondences
170
About the best meal which Sir John Fastolf never ate
173
About 4 princes 24 islands
177
Sir John Fastolfs farewell
187
Sir John Fastolfs permission for his transla tion
196
About Sir John Fastolfs prick
199
How Sir John Fastolf fell in love with a lady of London
207
How Sir John Fastolf went to Ireland in company with Prince Thomas
216

About the number 100 other numbers
38
Sir John Fastolfs invocation of Clio Muse of History
46
About Sir John Fastolfs belly his rat
49
About an indignity suffered by Sir John Fastolf at the hands of the Duchess of Norfolk
56
About a menu
64
How Sir John Fastolf went to war about the sea fight at Slugs
66
About the sea fight continued how Sir John Fastolf made his name terrible to the enemy
72
Sir John Fastolfs cursing of the cook
79
How Sir John Fastolf was apprenticed monk
82
About Badby the barrel
90
About the death of Sir John Fastolfs father
93
How Sir John Fastolf undressed himself of his suit of virgin white
96
How Sir John Fastolf came to London his praise of London Bridge
103
an aside of Sir John Fastolfs
109
About King Brokenanus his 24 sainted sons daughters
115
About St Georges Day Flagellants the Earthly Paradise
119
How Sir John Fastolf broke Skogans head
128
Mr Robert Shallow v
136
About swingebucklers bonarobas
143
About some more figs
151
About great events in the wide world
152
Sir John Fastolfs humble address to his readers
154
Lord Grey of Ruthin to the Prince of Wales
156
Sir John Fastolfs commentary on this exer cise in the art of royal arselicking
158
Sir John Fastolfs praise of May Day
162
About Mrs Nightwork the night at the windmill
165
How Sir John Fastolf conducted the militia at the siege of Kildare
219
About leprechauns St Boniface
222
About Sir John Fastolfs nose other noses
225
About Sir John Fastolfs soul
232
About a base attack upon Sir John Fastolf
235
About honour onions
239
How Sir John Fastolf came back to London
243
About heroes
248
About Prince Hal
250
About some other villains
251
About the preparations for the Battle of Gadshill
252
ist version
259
version
261
version
263
Sir John Fastolfs review of the action strategy tactics of the Battle of Gadshill
265
About a play at the Boars Head tavern
268
About the picking of Sir John Fastolfs pocket
274
About the Hotspur Mr Glendower with an interruption
276
Bardolphs tale
278
About the holy number 7
286
About some things beyond numbers
288
About the march to Coventry
289
About the Battle of Shrewsbury
292
Who killed Hotspur?
296
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About the author (2001)

Robert Thomas Nye was born in London, England on March 15, 1939. At the age of 16, he left school and published his first poem, Kingfisher, in the London Magazine. He was a poet who also wrote novels, plays, and stories for children. His collections of poetry include Juvenilia, Juvenilia 2, and The Rain and The Glass, which won the Cholmondeley Award. He became the poetry editor of the newspaper The Scotsman in 1967. From 1971 to 1996, he was the poetry critic of The Times of London. His children's books include Taliesin, March Has Horse's Ears, and Beowulf: A New Telling. His first novel for adults, Doubtfire, was published in 1967. His other novels for adults included The Life and Death of My Lord Gilles de Rais, Merlin, Faust, The Memoirs of Lord Byron, Mrs. Shakespeare: The Complete Works, and The Late Mr. Shakespeare. His novel, Falstaff, won The Hawthornden Prize and Guardian Prize for Fiction. During the early 1970s, he wrote several plays for BBC radio including A Bloody Stupid Hole. He died from cancer on July 3, 2016 at the age of 77.

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