Geography and Enlightenment

Front Cover
David N. Livingstone, Charles W. J. Withers
University of Chicago Press, Dec 15, 1999 - Science - 455 pages
Geography and Enlightenment explores both the Enlightenment as a geographical phenomenon and the place of geography in the Enlightenment. From wide-ranging disciplinary and topical perspectives, contributors consider the many ways in which the world of the long eighteenth century was brought to view and shaped through map and text, exploration and argument, within and across spatial and intellectual borders.

The first set of chapters charts the intellectual and geographical contexts in which Enlightenment ideas began to form, including both the sites in which knowledge was created and discussed and the different means used to investigate the globe. Detailed explorations of maps created during this period show how these new ways of representing the world and its peoples influenced conceptions of the nature and progress of human societies, while studies of the travels of people and ideas reveal the influence of far-flung places on Enlightenment science and scientific credibility. The final set of chapters emphasizes the role of particular local contexts in Enlightenment thought.

Contributors are Michael T. Bravo, Paul Carter, Denis Cosgrove, Stephen Daniels, Matthew Edney, Anne Marie Claire Godlewska, Peter Gould, Michael Heffernan, David N. Livingstone, Dorinda Outram, Chris Philo, Roy Porter, Nicolaas Rupke, Susanne Seymour, Charles Watkins, and Charles W. J. Withers.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (1999)

David N. Livingstone is professor of geography and intellectual history at the Queen's University of Belfast. Charles W. J. Withers is professor of geography at the University of Edinburgh. The editors have collaborated previously on Geography and Enlightenment, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Bibliographic information