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EVANGELIST'S TOUR

ROUND

INDIA;

WITH AN ACCOUNT OF

KESHUB CHUNDER SEN

AND THE

MODERN HINDU REFORMERS.

BY

J. F. B. TINLING, B.A.,

(BOD)

Of St. John's College, Cambridge.

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INTRODUCTION.

TWENTY years ago Lord Macaulay complained of the want of English interest in India, and declared that in spite of the closeness of our connexion with that country, and the claims of its Oriental civilisation and varied riches, it was a subject not only uninviting but positively distasteful to most readers. Since his day India has grown and changed with amazing rapidity, and a variety of events—political, natural, educational, and religious, -have called aloud to England for the manifestation of that interest which a mother country should have in her adopted daughter. The massacre of the great Rebellion burnt the name of India upon all hearts, and made it for a time the expression of our indignation and our fears; but the famine and pestilence which followed them, destroying nearly a million of Hindus, purified while they strengthened the memory-stirring the hearts and drawing out the helping hands of English Christians. Missions and other instruments of philanthropy during the last twelve years have received a mighty impulse, being alternately the effect and the cause of a daily increasing zeal and love; while the breaking up of old monopoly, and the call to the intellect and energy of all British subjects in the army and civil and merchant services, have drawn a member or a friend of nearly every English family into the wide new field as a means of communication between Britain and her Eastern Colonies. The practical distance, too, between Europe and Asia has been so shortened that all difficulties of the traveller, except those of expense, are well-nigh removed, for the fifteen thousand miles and weary months at sea have given place to eight thousand miles, accomplished in six weeks, with the luxuries of a coasting voyage, and the comfort and punctuality of first-class steamers. And it is probable that within the next twelve months, when

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