A General Collection of the Best and Most Interesting Voyages and Travels in All Parts of the World, Volume 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme (etc.), 1809 - Voyages and travels

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Page 10 - I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem. I was eyes to the blind, and feet was I to the lame. I was a father to the poor : and the cause which I knew not I searched out.
Page 53 - Perthshire in the year 1769, tells us that " on the first of May, the herdsmen of every village hold their Bel-tien, a rural sacrifice. They cut a square trench on the ground, leaving the turf in the middle ; on that they make a fire of wood, on which they dress a large caudle of eggs, butter, oatmeal and milk ; and bring besides the ingredients of the caudle, plenty of beer and whisky ; for each of the company must contribute something.
Page 478 - Are brought ; and feel by turns the bitter change Of fierce extremes, extremes by change more fierce ; From beds of raging fire, to starve in ice...
Page 386 - OH last and best of Scots ! who didst maintain Thy country's freedom from a foreign reign ; New people fill the land now thou art gone, New gods the temples, and new kings the throne. Scotland and thou did each in other live ; 5 Nor wouldst thou her, nor could she thee survive. Farewell, who dying didst support the state, And couldst not fall but with thy country's fate.
Page 304 - ... in order to form it; between the angles of which a yellow stalagmitic matter has exuded, which serves to define the angles precisely, and at the same time vary the colour with a great deal of elegance, and to render it still more agreeable, the whole is lighted from without...
Page 533 - Pennant accepted as reasonable the explanation of them given by the country people, who thought " they were designed for the chase, and that the terraces were made after the spots were cleared in lines from wood, in order to tempt the animals into the open paths after they were rouzed in order that they might come within reach of the bowmen who might conceal themselves in the woods above and below.
Page 635 - The plad being pleated all round, was tied with a belt below the breast; the belt was of leather, and several pieces of silver intermixed with the leather like a chain. The lower end of the belt has a piece of plate, about eight inches long and three in breadth, curiously engraven ; the end of which was adorned with fine stones, or pieces of red coral.
Page 304 - Compared to this what are the cathedrals or the palaces built by men! mere models or playthings, imitations as diminutive as his works will always be when compared to those of nature.
Page 517 - I have been bullied by an usurper ; I have been neglected by a court ; but I will not be dictated to by a subject : your man shan't stand. " ANNE Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery.
Page 53 - The rites begin with spilling some of the caudle on the ground, by way of libation: on that every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being...

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