Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" It is no answer to say that competition in the salt trade was not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inflicted upon the public ; it is enough... "
The American State Reports: Containing the Cases of General Value and ... - Page 270
edited by - 1900
Full view - About this book

Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Ohio, Volume 35

Ohio. Supreme Court - Law reports, digests, etc - 1880
...trade was not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of...tendency of such contracts is injurious to the public. Nor is this agreement within the principle which permits a person to bind himself not to engage in...
Full view - About this book

Proceedings of the Annual Session of the Bar Association of Tennessee

Tennessee Bar Association - Bar associations - 1889
...competition in the salt trade was not, in fact, destroyed, or that the price was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of...inflicted upon the public ; it is enough to know that the necessary effect is to injure the public." Cases to the same general effect are Alger v. Thacker, 19...
Full view - About this book

Supreme Court Reporter, Volume 15

Law reports, digests, etc - 1895
...not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodit; was not unreasonably advanced. Courts wil' not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inflicted...tendency of such contracts is Injurious to the public." In Craft v. McConoughy, 79 111. 340, 349, 350, which related to a combination between all the grain...
Full view - About this book

The Atlantic Reporter, Volume 29

Law reports, digests, etc - 1894
...exsts, which is injurious to the public interests. If injurious, it is void, as against public policy. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inflicted. It is enough to know that the natural tendency of such contracts is injurious. So, it is obviously...
Full view - About this book

The Railways and the Republic

James Fairchild Hudson - Interstate commerce - 1886 - 489 pages
...the salt trade was not destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inflicted on the public; it is enough to know that the inevitable tendency of such contracts is injurious to...
Full view - About this book

Harvard Law Review, Volume 22

Electronic journals - 1909
...another would be so few that the effect upon competition could not be measured, the answer is ready: "courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree...tendency of such contracts is injurious to the public." 2 And how could any other answer be thought of? For if it were attempted to draw the line just where...
Full view - About this book

The American and English Encyclopedia of Law, Volume 8

John Houston Merrill, Charles Frederic Williams, Thomas Johnson Michie, David Shephard Garland - Law - 1889
...trade was not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of...tendency of such contracts is injurious to the public. Nor is this agreement within the principle which permits a person to bind himself not to engage in...
Full view - About this book

Report of Committee on General Laws Relative to Combinations Commonly Known ...

New York (State). Legislature. Senate - 1889
...trade was not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of...tendency of such contracts is injurious to the public. In Croft v. McConoughy, the agreement was between all the grain producers in but a single town. It...
Full view - About this book

The Green Bag, Volume 16

Law - 1904
...exists which is injurious to the public interests; if injurious, it is void as against public policy. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inflicted. It is enough to know that the natural tendency of such contracts is injurious. So if the natural tendency...
Full view - About this book

The New York Supplement

Law reports, digests, etc - 1889
...trade w;is not in fact destroyed, or that the price of the commodity was not unreasonably advanced. Courts will not stop to inquire as to the degree of injury inilicted upon the public; it is enough to know that the inevitable tendency of such contracts is inj...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF