Travels and Discoveries in North and Central Africa: Being a Journal of an Expedition Undertaken Under the Auspices of H.B.M.'s Government: In the Years 1849-1855, Volume 2

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1857 - Africa, Central
 

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Page 126 - Tripoli; to the west, not only to Timbuktu, but in some degree even as far as the shores of the Atlantic, the very inhabitants of Arguin dressing in the cloth woven and dyed in Kano; to the east, all over Bornu, although there it comes in contact with the native industry of the country; and to the south it maintains a rivalry with the native industry of the I'gbira and I'gbo, while towards the south-east it invades the whole of 'Adamawa, and is only limited by the nakedness of the pagan sans-culottes,...
Page 466 - Benuwe, flowed here from east to west in a broad and majestic course, through an entirely open country, from which only here and there detached mountains started forth. The banks on our side rose to...
Page 108 - In another part were to be seen all the necessaries of life ; the wealthy buying the most palatable things for his table ; the poor stopping and looking greedily upon a handful of grain ; here a rich governor, dressed in silk and gaudy clothes, mounted upon a spirited and richly caparisoned horse, and followed by a host of idle, insolent slaves ; there a poor blind man, groping his way through the multitude, and fearing at every step to be trodden down ; here a yard neatly fenced with mats of reed,...
Page 87 - ... liberty, and in the tranquil enjoyment of the beautiful aspect of God's creation. The country through which we passed on leaving Shibdawa, formed one of the finest landscapes I ever saw in my life. The ground was pleasantly undulating, covered with a profusion of herbage not yet entirely dried...
Page 126 - The great advantage of Kano is, that commerce and manufactures go hand in hand, and that almost every family has its share in them. There is really something grand in this kind of industry, which spreads to the north as far as Murzuk, Ghat, and even Tripoli : to the west, not only to Timbuktu, but in some degree even as far as the shores of the Atlantic, the very inhabitants of Arguin dressing in the cloth woven and dyed in Kano ; to the east, all over...
Page 109 - ... busy preparing the meal for her absent husband, or spinning cotton, and, at the same time, urging the female slaves to pound the corn ; the children, naked and merry, playing about in the sand at the
Page 24 - ... the whole dwelling shaded with spreading trees, and enlivened with groups of children, goats, fowls, pigeons, and, where a little wealth had been accumulated, a horse or a pack-ox. With this character of the dwellings, that of the inhabitants themselves is in entire harmony, its most constant element being a cheerful temperament, bent upon enjoying life, rather given to women, dance, and song, but without any disgusting excess.
Page 163 - Ge"rki ; and we here took leave of Hausa with its fine and beautiful country, and its cheerful and industrious population. It is remarkable what a difference there is between the character of the ba-Haushe and the Kanuri — the former lively, spirited, and cheerful, the latter melancholic, dejected and brutal ; and the same difference is visible in their physiognomies — the former having in general very pleasant and regular features, and more graceful forms, while the Kanuri, with his broad face,...
Page 110 - marina', an open terrace of clay, with a number of dyeing-pots, and people busily employed in various processes of their handicraft ; here a man stirring the juice, and mixing with the indigo some colouring wood in order to give it the desired tint; there another drawing a shirt from the dye-pot, or hanging it up on a rope fastened to the trees; there two men beating a well-dyed shirt, singing the while, and keeping good time; further on, a blacksmith busy with his rude tools in making a dagger which...
Page 307 - kasukii leteninbe', every Monday immediately after my arrival, and found it very interesting, as it calls together the inhabitants of all the eastern parts of Bornu, the Shiiwa and the Koyam, with their corn and butter, the former, though of Arab origin and still preserving in purity his ancient character, always carrying his merchandise on the back of oxen, the women mounted upon the top of it while the African Koyam employs the camel, if not exclusively, at least with a decided preference ; the...

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