The Works of Nicholas Machiavel ...: Translated from the Originals; : Illustrated with Notes, Annotations, Dissertations, and Several New Plans on the Art of War,

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T. Davies ... J. Dodsley ... J. Robson ... G. Robinson ... T. Becket ... [and 2 others], 1775 - Political science
 

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Page 183 - Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator ? oft in bands While they keep watch, or nightly rounding walk. With heav'nly touch of instrumental sounds In full harmonic number join'd, their songs Divide the night, and lift our thoughts to heaven.
Page 180 - Egypt: and then it happened, that through all the city, for the space almost of forty days, there were seen horsemen running in the air, in cloth of gold, and armed with lances, like a band of soldiers, and troops of horsemen in array, encountering and running one against another, with shaking of shields, and multitude of pikes, and drawing of swords, and casting of darts, and glittering of golden ornaments, and harness of all sorts.
Page 162 - There are some penal laws fit to be retained but their penalty is too great; and it is ever a rule, that any over-great penalty, besides the acerbity of it, deadens the execution of the law:"
Page 22 - ... senate ; so that indeed they were rather the chief body of the nobility, or the first ministers of state, than a distinct branch of the sovereignty, in which none can be looked upon as a part who are not a part of the legislature. Had the consuls been invested with the regal authority to as great a degree as our monarchs, there would never have been any...
Page 51 - Divine worship and religious duties always tends to the aggrandizement of a State, so a neglect and contempt of them may be reckoned amongst the first causes of its ruin. For, where there is no fear of God, it...
Page 55 - Christian states and republics would have been much more united and happy than what they are. Nor can there be a greater proof of its decadence than to witness the fact that the nearer people are to the Church of Rome, which is the head of our religion, the less religious are they.
Page 200 - Besides, none that feel sensibly the decays of age, and his life wearing off, can figure to himself those imaginary charms in riches and praise, that men...
Page 433 - Chremylus prevailed upon him to go to his houfe, where he met an old woman in a tatter'd raiment, who had been his gueft for many years, and whofe name was Poverty. The old woman refufing to turn out fo eafily as he would have her, he...
Page 13 - truth), commonly brings it to light in the end." And the same principle is to be found in every Writer on Government. Laws, we are told, are made to guard against what men may do, and not to trust to what they will do ; nor is the sentiment confined to barren generalities or speculative Authors. It is adopted into vulgar, daily practice; and the...
Page 12 - Democracy, by the fteps and for the reafons already affigneds yet the Royal power was never entirely abolifhed and given to the Patricians, nor that of the Patricians wholly to the Plebeians ; on the contrary, the authority of the three Eftates being duly proportioned and mixed together, gave it the higheft...

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