The Boy's Treasury of Sports, Pastimes, and Recreations

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D. Bogue, (Late Tilt and Bogue), 1844 - Amusements - 464 pages
 

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Great resource for games.

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Page 35 - How MANY miles to Babylon? Three score miles and ten. Can I get there by candle-light? Yes, and back again.
Page 438 - Twill be found in the sphere when 'tis riven asunder, Be seen in the lightning, and heard in the thunder ; 'Twas allotted to man with his earliest breath, Attends at his birth and awaits him in death, Presides o'er his happiness, honour, and health, Is the prop of his house, and the end of his wealth.
Page 94 - During the great heats of summer there is no danger in bathing, however warm we may be, in rivers which have been thoroughly warmed by the sun; but to throw one's self into cold spring water when the body has been heated by exercise in the sun, is an imprudence which may prove fatal.
Page 437 - Twas in heaven pronounced, and 'twas muttered in hell, And echo caught faintly the sound as it fell ; On the confines of earth 'twas permitted to rest, And the depths of the ocean its presence confest.
Page 94 - ... and wholesome an exercise. Soldiers particularly should, methinks, all be taught to swim ; it might be of frequent use, either in surprising an enemy or saving themselves ; and if I had now boys to educate, I should prefer those schools (other things being equal) where an opportunity was afforded for acquiring so advantageous an art, which, once learned, is never forgotten.
Page 190 - ... shall be guilty of a misdemeanour, and being convicted thereof shall be liable at the discretion of the court to be imprisoned for any term not exceeding two years, with or without hard labour.
Page 256 - Wisely regardful of the embroiling sky, In joyless fields and thorny thickets leaves His shivering mates, and pays to trusted man His annual visit. Half afraid, he first Against the window beats; then, brisk, alights On the warm hearth; then, hopping o'er the floor, Eyes all the smiling family askance, And pecks, and starts, and wonders where he is! Till, more familiar grown, the table crumbs Attract his slender feet.
Page 94 - When I was a boy, I amused myself one day with flying a paper kite; and, approaching the bank of a pond which was near a mile broad, I tied the string to a stake, and the kite ascended to a very considerable height above the pond, while I was swimming. In a little time, being desirous of amusing myself with my kite, and enjoying at the same time the pleasure of swimming, I returned; and...
Page 94 - I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond...

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