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of secondary, not. SECT.
24, 25. Reason of our mistake in 1. No knowledge without it.
this.

2. The difference of wit and
26. Secondary qualities two- judgment.

fold; first, immediately 3. Clearness alone binders
perceivable ; secondly,

confusion.
immediately perceivable. 4. Comparing.

5. Brutes compare but im-
CHAP. IX.

perfectly.

6. Compounding.
Of perception.

7. Brutes compound but lit-

SECT.

tle.

1. It is the first simple idea 8. Naming.

of reflection.

9. Abstraction.

2-4, Perception is only when 10, 11. Brutes abstract not.

the mind receives the im. 12, 13. Idiots and madmen.

pression,

14. Method.

5, 6. Children, tho' they have 15. These are the beginnings

ideas in the womb, have

of human knowledge.

none innate.

16. Appeal to experience.

7. Which ideas first, is not 17. Dark room.

evideot.

8-10. Ideas of sensation often

CHAP, XII.
changed by the judge
ment.

Of complex ideas

11–14. Perception puts the dif- SECT.

ference between animals 1. Made by the mind out of

and inferior beings.

simple ones.

15. Perception the iulet of 2. Made voluntarily.

knowledge.

3. Are either modes, sub-

stances, or relations.

CHAP. X.

4. Modes.

5. Simple and mixed modes.
Of retention.

6. Substances single or col-

SECT.

lective.

1. Contemplation.

7. Relation.

2. Memory.

8. The abstrusest ideas from

3. Attention, repetition,

the two sources.

pleasure and pain, fix

ideas.

CHAP. XIII.

1,5. Ideas fade in the memory.

6. Constantly repeated ideas Of space and its simple modes.

cap scarce be lost. SECT.

7. In remembering, the 1. Simple modes.
mind is often active.

2. Idea of space.

8, 9. Two defects in the me. 3. Space and extension,

mory, oblivion and slow.

4. Immensity.

5, 6. Figure.

10. Brutes have memory.

1-10. Piace.

11-14. Extension and body not

CHAP. XI.

the same.

15. The definition of exten-

Of discerning, &c.

sion, or of space, does 17. Time is duration set out
not explain it.

by measures.

16. Division of beings into 18. A good measure of time

bodies and spirits proves

must divide its whole

not body and space the

duration into equal pe-

riods.

17, 18. Substance, which we 19. The revolutions of the sun

know not, no proof a-

and moon, the properest

gainst space without bo-

measures of time.

dy.

20. But not by their motion,

19, 20. Substance and accidents but periodical appearan-

of little use in philoso-

phy

21. No two parts of duration

21. A vacuum beyand the ut-

can be certainly known to

most bounds of body.

be equal.

22. The power of annihila- 22. Time not the measure of

tion proves a vacuum.

motion..

23. Motion proves a vacuum. 23. Minutes, hours, .and

24. The ideas of space and

years, not necessary mea.

body distinct.

sures of duration.

25, 26. Extension being insepa. 24-26. Our measure of time ap-

rable from body, proves

plicable to duration be.

it not the samé.

fore time.

27. Ideas of space and soli. 27-30. Eternity.

dity distinct.

28. Men differ little in clear

CHAP. XV.

simple ideas.

Of duration and expansion con-

CHAP. XIV.

sidered together.

SECT.

Of duration and its simple modes. 1. Both capable of greater

SECT.

and less.

1. Duration is feeting ex. 2. Expansion not bounded

tension

by matter.

24. Its idea from reflection on 3. Nor duration by motion.
the train of our ideas.

4. Why men more easily
5. The idea of duration ap-

admit infinite duration,
plicable to things whilst

than infinite expansion.
we sleep.

5. Time to duration, is as
6-8. The idea of succession

place to expansion.
pot from motion.

6. Time and place are taken
9-11. The train of ideas has a

for so much of either as
certain degree of quick-

are set out by the ex.

istence and motion of bo-
12. This train, the measure

dies.
of other successions.

7. Sometimes for so much
13-15. The mind cannot fix long

of either as we design by
on one invariable idea.

measure taken from the
16. Ideas, however made,

bulk or motion of bodies.
include no sense of mo- 8. They belong to all be-
tion.

ings.

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ness.

+

nite space.

9. All the parts of exten-

9. Number affords us the
sion, are extension; and

clearest idea of intinity.
all the parts of duration 10, 11. Our different conception
are duration.

of the infinity of number,
10. Their parts inseparable.

duration, and expansion.
11. Duration is as a line, ex- 12. Infinite divisibility.
pansion as a solid.

13, 14. No positive idea of infi.
12. Duration has never two

uity.
parts together, expansion 15–19. What is positive, what ne.
all together.

gative, in our idea of in-

fivite.
CHAP. XVI.

16, 17. We have no positive idea

of infinite duration.
Of vumber.

18. No positive idea of infi-
SECT.

1. Number, the simplest 20. Some think they have a

and most universal idea.

positive idea of eternity,

2. Its modes made by ad.

and not of infinite space.

dition.

21. Supposed positive idea of

3. Each mode distinct.

infinity, cause of mis-

4. Therefore demonstrati-

takes.

ons in numbers the most 22. All these ideas from sen-

precise.

sation and reflection.

5, 6. Names necessary to num-

bers.

7. Why children number not

CHAP. XVIII.

earlier.

8. Number measures all Of other simple modes.
measurables.

SECT.

1, 2. Modes of motion.
CHAP. XVII.

3. Modes of sounds.

4. Modes of colours.
Of Infinity.

5. Modes of tastes and
SECT.

smells.
1. Infinity in its original 6. Some simple modes have

intentions attributed to
space, duration, and num-

7. Why some modes have,
ber.

and others have not

2. The idea of finite easily

got.

3. How we come by the

idea of infinity.

CHAP. XIX.

4. Our idea of space bound-

less.

Of the modes of thinking.

5. And so of duration. SECT.

6. Why other ideas are not 1, 2, Sensation, remembrance,

capable of infinity.

contemplation, &c.

7. Difference between infi-

3. The various attention of

nity of space and space

the mind in thinking.

infinite.

4. Hence it is probable that

8. We have no idea of infi-

thinking is the action,

not essence of the soul.

VOL. I.

no names.

nite space.

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31. Uneasiness determines

7. Joy.

the will.

8. Sorrow.

32. Desire is uneasiness.

9. Hope.

33. The uneasiness of desire

10. Fear.

determines the will.

11. Despair.

34. This the spring of action.

12. Anger.

35. The greatest positive good

13. Envy.

determines not the will,

14. What passions, all men

but uneasiness.

have.

36. Because the removal of

15, 16. Pleasure and pain, what.

uneasiness is the first step

17. Shame.

to happiness.

18. These instances do show 37. Because uneasiness alone
how our ideas of the pas-

is present.
sions are got from sensa- 38. Because all, who allow
tion and reflection.

the joys of heaven possi-

ble, pursue them not. But
CHAP: XXI.

a great uneasiness is ne.

ver neglected.
Of Power.

39. Desire accompanies all.
SECT.

nneasiness,
1. This idea how got.

40. The most pressing unea.
2. Power active and passive. siness naturally deter.
3. Power includes relation.

mines the will.
4. The clearest idea of ac- 41. All desire happiness.

tive power had from spi- 42. Happiness, what.

rit.

43. What good is desired,

5. Will and understanding,

what not.
two powers.

44. Why the greatest good is

6. Faculties.

not always desired.

7. Whence the ideas of lie 45. Why, not being desired,
berty and necessity.

it moves not the will.
8. Liberty, what.

46. Due consideration raises
9. Supposes understanding

desire.
and will.

47. The power to suspend the

10. Belongs not to volition.

prosecution of any desire,

11. Voluntary opposed to ille

makes way for considera-

voluntary, not to neces-

tion.

sary.

48, To be determined by our

12. Liberty, what..

own judgment, is no rea

straiot to liberty.

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