John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 30, 2006 - History - 767 pages
0 Reviews
This book is a major new intellectual and cultural history of intolerance and toleration in early modern and early Enlightenment Europe. John Marshall offers an extensive study of late seventeenth-century practices of religious intolerance and toleration in Europe and of the arguments which John Locke made in defence of 'universal religious toleration'. This study is a significant contribution to the history of the 'republic of letters' of the 1680s and will be essential reading for scholars of early modern European history, religion, political science, and philosophy.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

to life As he put it liberty is to be
54
2
55
REPRESENTATIONS OF THE PERSECUTION OF WALDENSIANS AND
62
The French king having often yea upon all occasions showed
69
Protestantism internationally as well as domestically While Williams own
83
planned to destroy the Reformation and extirpate the northern heresy
89
gained in 1641 were under threat from James and Every
92
3
94
RELIGIOUS INTOLERANCE JUSTIFIED AND ADVOCATED
358
12
371
Paul Rycauts The Present State of the Greek and Armenian
395
13
396
heresy trodden underfoot as themes for pictures and Charles Le
401
LIBERTINES AND SODOMITES THE PESTILENTIAL
411
14
418
theologyconcerningthepower ofKings intheworks ofAmyraut andMerlat
439

dissenters in Spring 1686 not until April 1687 did he
115
but Clear Confutation of the Doctrine of the Trinity was
128
Rochester or his friends Charles Blount and Thomas Hobbes had
133
many Catholic pilgrimages continuing even if legally proscribed it was
137
4
138
Burnetpolitical refugees whoweredefenders of tolerationbut also for other
162
of Venice as well as the famously libertine monarchies of
179
5
197
magisterial Reformation Protestants by questioning the role of the
212
6
224
7
244
prison and to receive such bodily punishment and other mulct
253
stake34 Even the allegedly moderate Bishop Hall who wished to
256
8
264
The Catholic Church in general was held by many early
275
9
281
stressed Protestants such as William Perkins celebrated marriage and held
287
NAYLER AND THE QUAKERS
293
Accusations that Quakers were witches and used the power of
297
10
312
11
335
15
440
IMAGES OF RESTORATION SCHISMATICS AND HERETICS
450
16
469
and intellectual relationships and to accent only acrimony and distance
501
to indicate that this period saw the definition and
507
TOLERATION AND THE REVIEW OF RELIGIOUS WORKS IN THE JOURNALS
528
journals Rather than engage in a repetitive rendition of such
535
17
536
true Protestant Christianity62 Such a criticism of Bayles argument should
560
18
568
REDEFINING HERESY AND SCHISM
575
necessary to others without violating Christian LibertyDiscussing an issue
586
19
593
20
618
TOLERANT PRIMITIVE CHRISTIANITY AND INTOLERANT LATE
640
21
647
me to Orthodoxy and so am I would the second
663
tyranniseoverothers97IntheTheologiaChristianaLimborchdiscussedthose
679
22
680
libertines even if they supported positions others then considered
681
LIBERTINES AND SODOMITES
706

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Born in Australia in 1949, John Guy grew up in England. Early in life Guy developed a love of history. He pursued that interest and read History under the supervision of Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton, the pre-eminent Tudor scholar of the late-twentieth century. John Guy took a First and became a Research Fellow of Selwyn College in 1970. Awarded a Greene Cup by Clare College in 1970, he completed his PhD on Cardinal Wolsey in 1973 and won the Yorke Prize of the University of Cambridge in 1976. John Guy has lectured extensively on Early Modern British History and Renaissance Political Thought in both Britain and the United States. He has published 16 books and numerous academic articles. Guy's book My Heart is My Own: the life of Mary Queen of Scots (Harper Perennial, 2004) won the 2004 Whitbread Biography Award, the Marsh Biography Award, was a finalist in the USA for the 2004 Biography/Autobiography of the Year Award (National Books Critics' Circle), and has been translated into Spanish and Czech. Other books include Thomas More (Hodder Arnold, 2000), and The Tudors: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 1990). For over twenty years he was co-editor of the acclaimed academic series Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History; and co-author of The Reign of Elizabeth I: Court and Culture in the Last Decade (Cambridge University Press, 1995) and contributed to The Oxford History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Britain, The Oxford Illustrated History of Tudor and Stuart Britain, and The Oxford History of the British Isles: the Sixteenth Century.