The history of England (during the middle ages).

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 96 - Fear not : for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name ; thou art mine. When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee ; . and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee : when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned ; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee. For I am the Lord thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Saviour : I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba for thee.
Page 96 - Fear not, thou worm Jacob, and ye men of Israel; I will help thee, saith the Lord, and thy redeemer, the Holy One of Israel.
Page 532 - After the scole of Stratford atte bowe, For Frenche of Paris was to hire unknowe.
Page 96 - Fear not: for I am with thee: I will bring thy seed from the east, and gather thee from the west; I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth...
Page 532 - He coude songes make, and wel endite, Juste and eke dance, and wel pourtraie and write. So hote he loved, that by nightertale He slep no more than doth the nightingale. Curteis he was, lowly, and servisable, And carf beforn his fader at the table.
Page 534 - Than is the lilie on hire stalkes grene. And fresscher than the May with floures newe — For with the rose colour strof hire hewe, I not which was the...
Page 532 - She wolde wepe if that she saw a mous Caughte in a trappe, if it were ded or bledde.
Page 522 - The turtle said (and wex for shame all red) " Though that his lady evermore be straunge, Yet let him serve her alway, till he be deed, Forsooth, I praise not the gooses reed, For tho she died, I would none other make, I will be hers, till that the death me take.
Page 324 - If we examine, without prejudice, the ancient heathen mythology, as contained in the poets, we shall not discover in it any such monstrous absurdity as we may at first be apt to apprehend. Where is the difficulty in conceiving, that the same powers or principles, whatever they were, which formed this visible world, men and animals, produced also a species -of intelligent creatures, of more refined substance and greater authority than the rest...
Page 579 - Pryde, Covetyse and Envye han so enflawmed the Hertes of Lordes of the World, that thei are more besy for to disherite here Neyghbores, more than for to chalenge or to conquere here righte Heritage before seyd. And the comoun Peple, that wolde putte here Bodyes and here Catelle, for to conquere oure Heritage, thei may not don it withouten the Lordes. For a semblee of Peple withouten a Cheventeyn, or a chief Lord, is as a Flock of Scheep withouten a Schepperde; the which departeth and desparpleth,...

Bibliographic information