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A TALE OF THE NEUTRAL GROUND.

BY J. FENIMORE COOPER.

" Breathes there a man with soul so dead,

Who never to himself hath said,
This is my own, my native land !"

'COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME

NEW EDITION.

NEW YORK:
STRINGER AND TOWNSEND

TARVARD
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY
048459

THE SPY.

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Southern District of New York, ss.
BE it remembered, that on the seventh aay of depremier, in the forty-sixth
year of the Independence of the United States of America, Wiley & Halsted,
of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right
whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit:
“The Spy; a Tale of the Neutral Ground.

• Breathes there a man, with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,

This is my own, my native land ?'
By the Author of "Precaution.' In Two Volumes."
In conformity to the Act of Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An Act
for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and
books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein
nentioned ;” and also to an Act, entitled, on Act, supplementary to an Ach
entitled, An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of
maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during
the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of
designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

JAMES DILL,
Clerk of the Southern District of New York.

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TO

JAMES AITCHISON.

1 Avail myself with great pleasure of the opportunity that is offered to me, of again manifesting the esteem which I entertain for you. I repeat the assurances of my regard the more readily, because there are those who are anxious to interpret some of the incidents in this fiction to the disadvantage of the British character. To you, who know my private sentiments on all subjects, it will be unnecessary to say, that national illiberality is not among my foibles; or that I am in the smallest degree insensible to the many valuable qualities which form the ground-work of an Englishman's virtues. I think the book itself is my justification on this point. If there be any individual criminality portrayed, that is not to be traced to the faults of our common nature, under the operation of peculiar circumstances, I am not conscious of it; and I am aware that all Englishmen, who, like yourself, are educated, liberal, and intelligent, will realily admit, that less offensive matter could not easily be introduced in a tale, professedly written with a view to draw thc imaginations of our read

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