Personal narrative of the campaigns in Affghanistan, Sinde, Beloochistan, etc., letters. With an appendix. Compiled by W.E. Steele

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Page 4 - To sum up their character in a few words," concludes the same judicious author, " their vices are, revenge, envy, avarice, 'rapacity, and obstinacy ; on the other hand, they are fond of liberty, faithful to their friends, kind to their dependants, hospitable, brave, hardy, frugal, laborious, and prudent ; and they are less disposed than the nations in their neighbourhood to falsehood, intrigue, and deceit.
Page 162 - Content with the limits nature appears to have assigned to its empire, the Government of India will devote all Its efforts to the establishment and maintenance of general peace, to the protection of the Sovereigns and Chiefs its allies, and to the prosperity and happiness of its own faithful subjects.
Page 100 - Russia has a right, and which alone can insure the maintenance of peace. This is the purpose of the present expedition; and as soon as it shall be attained, and an order of things conformable to the interests of Russia and the neighbouring Asiatic states shall be established on a permanent footing, the body of troops which has received orders to march on Khiva will return to the frontiers of the empire.
Page 160 - The Government of India directed its army to pass the Indus, in order to expel from Afghanistan a Chief believed to be hostile to British interests, and to replace upon his throne a Sovereign represented to be friendly to those interests and popular with his former subjects.
Page 161 - Cabul, have again attached the opinion of invincibility to the British arms. " The British army in possession of Afghanistan will now be withdrawn to the Sutlej. The Governor-General will leave it to the AfFghans themselves to create a government amidst the anarchy which is the consequence of their crimes.
Page 173 - Brigadier Sale I feel deeply indebted, for the gallant and soldier-like manner in which he conducted the responsible and arduous duty entrusted to him in command of the storming party, and for the arrangements he made in the citadel, immediately after taking possession of it. The sabre wound which he received in the face did not prevent his continuing to direct his column, until everything was secure, and I am happy in the opportunity of bringing to your Lordship's notice the excellent conduct of...
Page 161 - To force a sovereign upon a reluctant people, would be as inconsistent with the policy as it is with the principles of the British Government, tending to place the arms and resources of that people at the disposal of the first invader, and to impose the burden of supporting a sovereign without the prospect of benefit from his alliance. The Governor-General will willingly recognise any Government approved by the Afghans themselves, which shall appear desirous and capable of maintaining friendly relations...
Page 171 - HM's 13th Light Infantry, commanding the advance consisting of the light companies of HM's 2nd and 17th foot, and of the Bengal European regiment, with one company of HM's 13th Light Infantry, proceeded to the gate, and with great difficulty, from the rubbish thrown down, and the determined opposition offered by the enemy, effected an entrance, and established themselves within the gateway, closely followed by the main column, led in a spirit of great gallantry by Brigadier Sale, to whom I had entrusted...
Page 162 - British army and an enemy approaching from the west — if, indeed, such an enemy there can be — and no longer between the army and its supplies. " The enormous expenditure required for the support of a large force in a false military position, at a distance from its own frontier and its resources, will no longer arrest every measure for the improvement of the country and of the people.

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