Further Thoughts on the Present State of Public Opinion: Being a Continuation of A Timely Appeal to the Common Sense of the People of Great Britain in General and of the Inhabitants of Buckinghamshire in Particular, on the Present Situation of Affairs

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Hatchard, 1800 - Great Britain - 185 pages

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Page 85 - Is not a patron, my lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help? The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early, had been kind; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it.
Page i - Men thinking freely, will, in particular instances, think differently. But still as the greater part of the measures which arise in the course of public business are related to, or dependent on, some great leading general principles in government, a man must be peculiarly unfortunate in the choice of his political company if he does not agree with them at least nine times in ten.
Page 99 - Thou mad'st me what I am, with all the spirit, Aspiring thoughts and elegant desires That fill the happiest man?
Page 156 - Infinity has a tendency to fill the mind with that sort of delightful horror which is the most genuine effect and truest test of the sublime. There are scarce any things which can become the objects of our senses, that are really and in their own nature infinite . but the eye not being able to perceive the bounds of many things, they seem to be infinite, and they produce the same effects as if they were really so.
Page 52 - ... is a name I shall apply to all such qualities in things as induce in us a sense of affection and tenderness, or some other passion the most nearly resembling these.
Page 77 - But cawing rooks, and kites that swim sublime In still repeated circles, screaming loud, The jay, the pie, and e'en the boding owl, That hails the rising moon, have charms for me. Sounds inharmonious in themselves and harsh, Yet heard in scenes where peace for ever reigns, And only there, please highly for their sake.
Page 153 - If a discourse on the use of the parts of the body may be considered as an hymn to the Creator ; the use of the passions, which are the organs of the mind, cannot be barren of praise to him, nor unproductive to ourselves of that noble and uncommon union...
Page 32 - Bacon; hapless in his choice, Unfit to stand the civil storm of state, And through the smooth barbarity of courts, With firm but pliant virtue, forward still To urge his course: him for the studious shade Kind nature form'd, deep, comprehensive, clear, Exact, and elegant: in one rich soul, Plato, the Stagyrite, and Tully join'd.
Page vi - Deut. xvi. 20, and to do to others as we would they should do to us.
Page 156 - ... the imagination is entertained with the promise of something more, and does not acquiesce in the present object of the sense.

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