Farewell, Revolution: Disputed Legacies, France, 1789/1989

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Cornell University Press, Sep 5, 2018 - History - 608 pages
The interpretation of the French Revolution has long been the most contentious issue in French history. How the Revolution should be remembered has been the focus of debates concerned as much with France's future as with its past. Kaplan both reviews these debates and reconstructs - in sometimes hilarious detail - events leading up to the official commemoration. Bringing to bear the skills of the archival historian and the ethnographer, he masterfully explains how a particular political culture attempts to come to terms with its past. As he sketches a provocative picture of politics in France today, he has much to say about more general relationships between memory and collective identity, history and politics.
 

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Contents

General Introduction
1
BOOK ONE FRAMING THE BICENTENNIAL
13
BOOK TWO PRODUCING THE BICENTENNIAL
175
BOOK THREE THE BICENTENNIAL AND THE NATION
345
Farewell
470
Notes
487
Index
559
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About the author (2018)

Steven Laurence Kaplan is Goldwin Smith Professor of History at Cornell University. He is the author of Provisioning Paris: Merchants and Millers in the Grain and Four Trade during the Eighteenth Century and of the complementary work Farewell, Revolution: Disputed Legacies, France, 1789/1989, both from Cornell.

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