The Parliamentary Or Constitutional History of England: Being a Faithful Account of All the Most Remarkable Transactions in Parliament, from the Earliest Times. Collected from the Journals of Both Houses, the Records, Original Manuscripts, Scarce Speeches, and Tracts; All Compared Withthe Several Contemporary Writers, and Connected, Throughout, with the History of the Times. By Several Hands...

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Printed; and sold by T. Osborne; and W. Sandby, 1761 - Great Britain
 

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Page 98 - Or if a Man do levy War against our Lord the King in his Realm, or be adherent to the King's Enemies in his Realm, giving to them Aid and Comfort in the Realm or elsewhere...
Page 363 - Company, should be deemed a betrayer of the rights and liberties of the commons of England, and an infringer of the privileges of the house of commons.
Page 346 - ... by an express warrant in writing, under the hand of one of the principal secretaries of state, for every such opening, detaining, or delaying...
Page 215 - Strafford, (which was published by order of the commons' house,) ' The law is the safeguard, the custody of all private interest ; your honours, your lives, your liberties, and estates are all in the keeping of the law ; without this every man hath a like right to any thing.
Page 180 - ... esteem the liturgy of the Church of England, contained in the Book of Common Prayer and by law established...
Page 3 - Conquest, and some by election of the people, their wills at that time served for Law; yet how soon Kingdoms began to be settled in civility and policy, then did Kings set down their minds by Laws, which are properly made by the King only, but at the rogation of the people, the King's grant being obtained thereunto.
Page 98 - ... it is accorded, that if any other case supposed treason which is not above specified, doth happen before any justices, the justices shall tarry without any going to judgment of the treason, till the cause be shewed and declared before the King and his parliament, whether it ought to be judged treason or other felony.
Page 270 - Resolved, that it is a high infringement of the liberties and privileges of the Commons of the United Kingdom for any lord of parliament or other...
Page 103 - We are confident that both the High and Mighty Lords the States General of the United Provinces...
Page 283 - Resolved, &c., iiemine contradicente, that in all aids given to the king by the Commons the rate or tax ought not to be altered by the Lords. (ii) 3 July 1678 Resolved, &c., that all aids and supplies, and aids to his Majesty in Parliament, are the sole gift of the Commons ; and all bills for the granting of any such aids...

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