The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins, Volume 1

Front Cover
Reeves & Turner, 1884 - English literature - 300 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxi - The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins, A Cornish Man; Relating particularly, His Shipwreck near the South Pole; his wonderful Passage thro' a subterraneous Cavern into a kind of new World; his there meeting with a Gawry or flying Woman, whose Life he...
Page 146 - I was likely to remain ignorant of what was doing about me. For, says I, if I am in a land of spirits, as now I have little room to doubt, there is no guarding against them. I am never safe, even in my grotto ; for that can be no security against such beings as can sail on the water in no boats, and fly in the air on no wings (as the case now appears to me), who can be here and there, and wherever they please. What a miserable state, I say, am I fallen to ! I should have been glad to have had human...
Page 64 - I have done the business." — "Aye! business enough, I think," says I, "and more than I would have done to have been king of Congo." — "Why, Peter," says he, "there is nothing but a man may compass by resolution, if he takes both ends of a thing in his view at once, and fairly deliberates on both sides what may be given and taken from end to end.
Page xvii - Those things that seem very difficult and fearfull at the first may grow very facil after frequent trial and exercise: And therefore he that would effect any thing in this kind must be brought up to the constant practice of it from his Youth; trying first only to use his wings in running on the ground, as an Estrich or tame geese will do, touching the earth with his toes; and so by degrees learn to rise higher till he shall attain unto skill and confidence. I have heard it from credible testimony...
Page 165 - I verily believe all you said is true ; and I promise you, as you have seemed so much to delight in me, I will never quit you, till death or other as fatal accident shall part us. But we will now, if you choose, go home ; for I know you have been some time uneasy in this gloom, though agreeable to me. For, giving my eyes the pleasure of looking eagerly on you, it conceals my blushes from your sight.
Page 147 - I could use with myself was but in vain to obtain me any quiet. In the height of my distress I had recourse to prayer, with no small benefit ; begging, that if it pleased not the Almighty power to remove the object of my fears, at least to resolve my doubts about them, and to render them rather helpful than hurtful to me. I hereupon, as I always did on such occasions, found myself much more placid and easy, and began to hope the best, till I had almost persuaded myself that I was out of danger ;...
Page 148 - I then went to seize her in my arms; but the hurry of my spirits awakened me. When I got up, I kept at home, not caring even to look out at my door. My dream ran strangely in my head, and I had now nothing but Patty in my mind. "Oh!" cries I, "how happy could I be with her, though I had only her in this solitude. Oh! that this was but a reality, and not a dream." And indeed, though it was but a dream, I could scarce refrain from running to the lake to meet my Patty. But then I checked my folly, and...
Page 153 - Bet the things we had been using for supper in their places, I laid myself down too ; for I could have no suspicious thoughts, or fear of danger from a form so excellent. I treated her for some time with all the respect imaginable, and never suffered her to do the least part of my work. It was very inconvenient to both of us only to know each other's meaning by signs ; but I could not be otherwise than pleased to see, that she endeavoured all in her power to learn to talk like me. Indeed I was not...
Page 146 - ... case now appears to me, who can be here and there, and wherever they please. What a miserable state, I say, am I fallen to. I should have been glad to have had human converse, and to have found inhabitants in this place; but there being none, as I supposed hitherto, I contented myself with thinking I was at least safe from all those evils mankind in society are obnoxious to. But now, what may be the consequence of the next hour I know not : nay, I am not able to say, but whilst I speak and show...
Page 156 - I first went myself over the stile of the door, and thinking it rather too high for her, I took her in my arms and lifted her over. But even when I had her in this manner, I knew not what to make of her clothing, it sat so true and close ; but seeing her by a steadier and truer light in the grove, though a heavy, gloomy one, than...

Bibliographic information