Some Observations and Remarks on a Late Publication: Intitled, Travels in Europe, Asia, and Africa, in which the Real Author of this New and Curious Asiatic Atalantis, His Character and His Abilities are Fully Made Known to the Publick, Volume 1

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author, and sold, 1782 - 167 pages
 

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Page 71 - ... (thatched) huts in what part of the town they pleased. . . . Every man permitted his own servants to erect straw huts against the outside of his house, but without digging holes, to prevent more disagreeable neighbours from occupying the spot. All distinction of character and order was thrown down, as much as if there had been a civil war in the town ; and in fact there was a civil and a judicial war too, for the Council-General and Supreme Court, who both arrived at the same time, went together...
Page 93 - Englifhmen go from Bengal to Heaven, in proportion to their number, as do from Great Britain ; but it is a national misfortune to lament the...
Page 70 - ... to the government, he added some new regulations, and gave a degree more power to the officers of police, divided the Black and White Town into thirty-five wards, and purchased the consent of the natives to go a little farther off. ' There are no stones, gravel, or other hard substances within 50 leagues of Calcutta with which to mend the roads. Burnt and broken bricks are all the materials we have, and very expensive they are; for lay them down as thick as you will, so rotten is the soil that...
Page 69 - ... public market. Thousands of these huts are run up wherever they are permitted to build near European settlements. . . . Much ground was cleared to make room for a new fort; many thousand huts thrown into the holes from whence they had been taken, to form roads and an esplanade; but every man who lost a hut had ground given him on which to make another, and always of more extent and more value than what had been taken away from him. ' Much was done by Governor Vansittart, Lord Clive, Governor...
Page 90 - ... the hen bird, and gave him the opportunity to see the gentleman dress or be dressed. In general, the young gentlemen, as soon after their arrival as they can, muster money to buy a horse, ride from a little before daylight until eight o'clock, then breakfast, and go directly to the public offices, where they write hard until two or three o'clock at noon, then dine, and if all their daily business is done, they drink tea, visit the ladies, and perhaps dance with them, or sup with them, or, which...
Page 70 - ... time they will be sunk a fathom deep. With Mr. Francis came the Judges of the Supreme Court, the laws of England, partial oppression, and licentious liberty; . . . and the natives were made to know that they might erect their chopper (thatched) huts in what part of the town they pleased. . . . Every man permitted his own servants to erect straw huts against the outside of his house, but without digging holes, to prevent...
Page 137 - Hastings had laughed at him for " his schoolboy truancy for ten days or a fortnight, he wrote pri" vately to Mr. Shore to return to Calcutta : this Mr. Shore let " Francis know, and he instantly grew better. This recovery, " Mr. Wheler announced at the Council board. Mr. Hastings " said that he had known as much two days before, adding that " Mr. Shore was coming down. Whether Mr. Wheler compre" hended the jest or no, I know not : but Mr.
Page 51 - ... digested the minute, and Mr. Francis copied it and carried it to the board. To prove this, I refer to his crude and undigested letters to the Company exhibited in the second report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons, namely Nos. VII. and VIII. of the Appendix. He never thought that those curious productions would have been brought forward to the public eye, or he would have got Mr. William Harwood, a very able Company's servant, who came home in the ship with him, to have revised...
Page 50 - ... future meeting. A copy of the proposition was carried home. Messrs. Shore, Ducarrell, Anderson, Alexander, or Mr. Charles Grant were sent for ; the three first on all matters of revenue, or Hindoo laws or customs ; the fourth on affairs of the army ; and the fifth on mercantile affairs; they digested the minute, and Mr. Francis copied it and carried it to the board. To prove this, I refer to his crude and undigested letters to the Company exhibited in the second report of the Select Committee...
Page 87 - ... complaint brought home against Governor Hastings, is, that he neglects his friends in his public capacity. How many of Mr. Francis's particular friends are now in office at Bengal ? Need I mention the Fowkes, Messrs. Moore, Livius, Collins, -with fifty of the Company's other servants, besides some who accompanied him to Europe, that have made fortunes in offices, from which the governor could have removed them without the least injustice, had he been splenetic? Yet their growlings rumble in the...

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