Education of Girls and Women in Great Britain

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S. Sonnenschein & Company, lim., 1897 - Women - 296 pages
 

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Page 24 - My dooty tords my nabers, to love him as thyself, and to do to all men as I wed thou shall do and to me, to love, onner, and suke my farther and mother, to onner and to bay the Queen, and all that are pet in a forty under her, to smit myself to all my gooness...
Page 100 - to inquire into the best means of extending a knowledge of the arts, and of the principles of design, among the people (especially the manufacturing population) of the country ; also to inquire into the constitution, management, and effects of institutions connected with the arts.
Page 6 - Nunneries also were good she-schools, wherein the girls and maids of the neighbourhood were taught to read and work ; and sometimes a little Latin was taught them therein. Yea, give me leave to say, if such feminine foundations had still continued, provided no vow were obtruded upon them, (virginity is least kept where it is most constrained,) haply the weaker sex, besides the avoiding modern inconveniences, might be heightened to a higher perfection than hitherto hath been attained.
Page 17 - Provided Always, that every Man and Woman, of what Estate or Condition that he be, shall be free to set their Son or Daughter to take Learning at any manner School that pleaseth them within the Realm.
Page 23 - My duty toads God is to bleed in Him, to fering and to loaf withold your arts, withold my mine, withold my sold, and with my sernth, to whirchp and give thanks, to put my old trash in Him, to call upon Him.
Page 75 - Want of thoroughness and foundation ; want of system ; slovenliness and showy superficiality; inattention to rudiments ; undue time given to accomplishments, and those not taught intelligently or in any scientific manner ; want of organisation — these may sufficiently indicate the character of the complaints we have received in their most general aspect.
Page 232 - Act of 1803, the schoolmasters elect were examined and approved by the Presbyteries, and were required to sign the Confession of Faith and the Formula of the Church of Scotland.
Page 254 - intermediate education" means a course of education which does not consist chiefly of elementary instruction in reading, writing, and arithmetic, but which includes instruction in Latin, Greek, the Welsh and English language and literature, modern languages, mathematics, natural and applied science, or in some of such studies, and generally in the higher branches of knowledge...
Page 91 - there is reason to think that the latter half of the nineteenth century will stand second, in respect of the greatness and variety of the charities created within its duration, to no other half-century since the Reformation.
Page 73 - Education : more particularly in all things ordinarily taught in other schools. " As Works of all sorts Dancing. Musick Half the time to be Singing Writing Keeping accompts spent in these things. " The other half to be employed in gaining the Latin and French tongues ; and those that please may learn Greek and Hebrew, the Italian and Spanish: in all which this Gentlewoman hath a competent knowledge.

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