A Voyage to St. Kilda: The Remotest of All the Hebrides. Or, Western Isles of Scotland. ... To which is Added, An Account of Roderick, the Late Imposter There, ... By M. Martin, Gent

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R. Griffith, 1749 - Saint Kilda (Scotland) - 82 pages

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Page 35 - ... their corruption ; they preserve them six, seven or eight months, as above said ; and then they become appetizing and loosening, especially those that begin to turn.
Page 27 - The Solan geese have always some of their mimber keeping centry in the night, and if they are surprised, as it often happens, all the flock are taken one after another; but if the centinel be awake at the approach of the creeping fowlers, and hear a noise, it cries softly, grog, grog...
Page 25 - ... breast, ie a bare spot from which the feathers have fallen off with the heat in hatching; its egg is twice as big as that of a Solan goose, and is variously spotted, black, green, and dark ; it comes without regard 'to any wind, appears the first of May, and goes away about the middle of June.
Page 34 - Every fowl lays an egg three different times except the Gair-fowl and Fulmar, which lay but once ; if the first or second egg be taken away, every fowl lays but one other egg that year, except the seamalls, and they ordinarily lay the third egg, whether the first and second eggs be taken away, or no.
Page 26 - ... it hath four toes ; the feet and legs black as far as they are bare ; the plumage is like that of a goose. The colour of the old ones is white all over, excepting the extreme tips of the wings, which are black, and the top of the head, which is yellow, as some think the effect of age. The young ones are of a hard brown colour, turning white after they are a year old...
Page 17 - ... be only for the space of one minute ; during which time his feet have no support, nor any part of his body touches the...
Page 51 - Macleod's presence, bowing his head and hand low near to the ground, his retinue doing the like behind him one after another, making, as it were, a chain...
Page 4 - ... put in under the hollow of an extraordinary high rock, to the north of this isle, which was all covered with a prodigious number of solan geese hatching in their...
Page 68 - Age is feigned by the poets to be, that theirs really is, I mean, in innocency and simplicity, purity, mutual love and cordial friendship, free from solicitous cares, and anxious covetousness; from envy, deceit, and dissimulation; from ambition and pride, and the consequences that attend them. They are altogether ignorant of the vices of foreigners, and governed by the dictates of reason and Christianity, as it was first delivered to them by those heroic souls whose zeal moved them to undergo danger...

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