Journal of the Texian Expedition Against Mier: Subsequent Imprisonment of the Author; His Sufferings, and the Final Escape from the Castle of Perote

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Harper and brothers, 1845 - Mier Expedition, 1842 - 487 pages

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Page 324 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 242 - With spiders I had friendship made, And watch'd them in their sullen trade, Had seen the mice by moonlight play, And why should I feel less than they? We were all inmates of one place, And I, the monarch of each race, Had power to kill — yet, strange to tell! In quiet we had learn'd to dwell — My very chains and I grew friends, So much a long communion tends To make us what we are: — even I Regain'd my freedom with a sigh.
Page 423 - SIR, -I have had the honour to receive your letter of the 22nd instant, in which you intimate to me your intention of violating the law.
Page 242 - And watched them in their sullen trade, Had seen the mice by moonlight play, And why should I feel less than they? We were all inmates of one place, And I, the monarch of each race, Had power to kill, — yet, strange to tell! In quiet we had learned to dwell, — My very chains and I grew friends, So much a long communion tends To make us what we are : — even I Regained my freedom with a sigh.
Page 392 - He seemed struggling to restrain it, but it burst from him in spite of all his efforts. His whole bearing showed the subdued character of the present Indians, and with the last stripe the expression of his face seemed that of thankfulness for not getting more. Without uttering a word, he crept to the major domo, took his hand, kissed it, and walked away. No sense of degradation crossed his mind. Indeed, so humbled is this once fierce people, that they have a proverb of their own, " Los Indios no...
Page 449 - He begged twenty minutes' longer respite ; upon which, I announced to the Captain that it would be necessary to send forward his master-of-arms, and have him ironed without delay. When the irons were brought within his view, the prisoner immediately jumped up, adjusted his collar, put on his hat, and stated his readiness to accompany us. Upon getting on deck, he saw a sentinel, evinced much agitation, and presented his bosom, evidently believing that he was about to be put to death. I took his arm,...
Page 255 - ... citizens of the United States entering on board foreign ships of war. without the expatriating clauses. This resolution was opposed by Messrs. BALDWIN, GILES, and VENABLE, and supported by the mover and Mr. HARPER. It was negatived — 49 to 46. - DEPREDATIONS ON COMMERCE. A Message was received from the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, of which the following is a copy, with the titles of the documents accompanying it : Gentlemen of the House of Representatives ; Immediately after I had received...
Page 122 - Among these were two of our acquaintances, Tom and Esau. These gentlemen, now of so much consequence as to ride three leagues in a coach to congratulate General Ampudia upon his splendid victory, were General Sam Houston's two barbers, so well known to the public of Texas. Tom treated us with marked respect and attention, spoke of his prospects in that country, his intended nuptials, invited us to the wedding, and said that General Ampudia was to stand godfather on the occasion. He remarked to General...
Page 160 - Young Robert W. Harris behaved in the most unflinching manner, and called upon his companions to avenge the murder, while their flowing tears and bursting hearts, invoking heaven for their witness, responded to the call.
Page 159 - I have killed twenty-five of the yellow-bellies ;" then demanding his dinner in a linn tone, and saying that " they shall not cheat me out of it," he ate heartily, smoked a cigar, and in twenty minutes after was launched into eternity ! The Mexicans said that this man had the biggest heart of any they ever saw. They shot him fifteen times before he expired...

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