Modern India: A Sketch of the System of Civil Government. To which is Prefixed Some Account of the Natives and Native Institutions

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1852 - India - 560 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 84 - A village, geographically considered, is a tract of country comprising some hundreds or thousands of acres of arable and waste land ; politically viewed, it resembles a corporation or township. Its proper establishment of officers and servants consists of the following descriptions. The potail, or head inhabitant, who has the general superintendence of the affairs of the village, settles the disputes of the inhabitants, attends to the police, and performs the duty...
Page 84 - Tallier and Totie — the duty of the former appearing to consist in a wider and more enlarged sphere of action, in gaining information of crimes and offences, and in escorting and protecting persons travelling from one village to another ; the province of the latter appearing to be more immediately confined to the village...
Page 276 - When a collector is old enough, he is made a judge ; and to this step there is almost no exception if it is wished for. It seems to be considered that, if at this time of life a man is fit for anything at all, he is fit for a judge ; and if he is fit for nothing, better make him a judge and get rid of him ; for once in that office he has no claim to further promotion by mere seniority alone.
Page 84 - The tallier and the totie, the duty of the former of which consists in gaining information of crimes and offences, and in escorting and protecting persons travelling from one village to another; the province of the latter appearing to be more immediately confined to the village, consisting, among other duties, in guarding the crops and assisting in measuring them. The boundary man, who preserves the limits of the village, or gives evidence respecting them in cases of dispute. The Superintendent of...
Page 187 - noble" clause in the Act of 1833, worthy of the British character for justice, generosity and humanity : "That no Native of the said territories, nor any naturalborn subject of his Majesty resident therein, shall, by reason only of his religion, place of birth, descent, or any of them, be disabled from holding any place, office or employment under the said Company.
Page 85 - Each township conducts its own internal affairs. It levies on its members the revenue due to the state; and is collectively responsible for the payment of the full amount. It manages its police, and is answerable for any property plundered within its limits. It administers justice to its own members, as far as punishing small offences, and deciding disputes in the first instance. It taxes itself, to provide funds for its internal expenses ; such as repairs of the walls and temple, and the cost of...
Page 462 - Mahomedan code ; but so altered and added to by our regulations that it is hardly to be recognised; and there has, in fact, by practice and continual emendative enactments, grown up a system of our own, well understood by those whose profession it is, and towards which the original Mahomedan law and Mahomedan lawyers are really little consulted.
Page 215 - The division of authority between the Board of Control and the Court of Directors, the large number of Directors, and the peculiar system by which measures are originated in the Court, sent for approval to the Board, then back again to the Court, and so on, render all deliverances very slow and difficult, and when a measure is discussed in India. the announcement that it has been referred to the Court of Directors, is often regarded as an indefinite postponement. In fact, it is evident that twenty-four...
Page 64 - ... the higher classes ; they cannot bear prosperity ; it causes them to degenerate, especially if born to greatness. The only efficient men, with of course a few exceptions, are those who have risen to greatness. The lowest of the people, if fate raised him to be an Emperor, makes himself at home in his new situation, and shows an aptitude of manner and conduct unknown to Europeans similarly situated. But his son is altogether degenerate ; hence the impossibility of adapting to anything useful most...
Page 85 - Bramin, or astrologer, who proclaims the lucky or unpropitious periods for sowing and threshing; the smith and carpenter, who manufacture the implements of agriculture and build the dwelling of the Ryot ; the potman, or potter ; the washerman ; the barber ; the cowkeeper, who looks after the cattle ; the doctor; the dancing-girl, who attends at rejoicings; the musician, and the poet.

Bibliographic information