Early Prose and Poetical Works of John Taylor, the Water Poet

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Hamilton, Adams & Company, 1888 - 318 pages
 

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Page 254 - Can a man take fire in his bosom, and his clothes not be burned? Can one go upon hot coals, and his feet not be burned?
Page 51 - ... and daggers, in the space of two hours, fourscore fat deer were slain ; which after are disposed of, some one way, and some another, twenty and thirty miles, and more than enough left for us to make merry withal, at our rendezvous.
Page 51 - Then after we had stayed there three hours or thereabouts, we might perceive the deer appear on the hills round about us (their heads making a show like a wood), which being followed close by the...
Page 50 - ... compass, they do bring, or chase in the deer, in many herds, (two, three, or four hundred in a herd,) to such or such a place, as the noblemen shall appoint them ; then, when day is come, the lords and gentlemen of their companies...
Page 50 - I was the space of twelve days after, before I saw either house, corn-field, or habitation for any creature, but deer, wild horses, wolves, and such like creatures, — which made me doubt that I should never have seen a house again.
Page 18 - I did undergoe this project, either in malice or mockage of Master BENJAMIN JONSON, I vow by the faith of a Christian that their imaginations are all wide...
Page 123 - ... turned him to the fire, and anointed his paunch with grease and butter, to make it stretch and hold ; and afterwards, being laid in bed, he slept eight hours, and fasted all the while ; which, when the knight understood, he commanded him to be laid in the stocks, and there to endure as long as he had laine bedrid with eating.
Page 49 - Their habit is — shoes, with but one sole a-piece ; stockings, (which they call short hose...
Page 119 - Quoytes-man, and that mistress who played so masterly a game at Irish ! But I thank thee for this, good John the Water-Poet ; thou hast told us that Monsieur La Ferr, a Frenchman, was the first inventor of the admirable game of Doublehand, Hot-cockles, &c., and that Gregory Dawson, an Englishman, devised the unmatchable mystery of Blind-man's-buff.

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