The Journal of the Society of arts, and of the institutions in union [afterw.] Journal of the Royal society of arts

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Page 157 - May one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five, the Straight Line or Distance between the Centres of the Two Points in the Gold Studs in the Straight Brass Rod, now in the Custody of the Clerk of the House of Commons, whereon the Words and Figures
Page 6 - ... 11. The arts may be encouraged by providing a room, free of expense, for the exhibition of the objects of the Art- Union and other similar societies.
Page 153 - But as both heaven and earth do conspire and contribute to the use and benefit of man; so the end ought to be, from both philosophies to separate and reject vain speculations, and whatsoever is empty and void, and to preserve and augment whatsoever is solid and fruitful: that knowledge may not be as a courtesan, for pleasure and vanity only, or as a bond-woman, to acquire and gain to her master's use; but as a spouse, for generation, fruit, and comfort.
Page 169 - ... the boat to unhook at the same time, and an accident must inevitably happen. Or, supposing that all has gone right on board the ship, and that before the boat has reached the water, a sea -should lift the stern of the boat and unhook the after-tackle, then (as...
Page 6 - For the promotion and encouragement of Manufactures and the Mechanic and Useful Arts, by the establishment of popular lectures on the sciences connected with them ; by the formation of a...
Page 157 - ... the same straight line or distance between the centres of the said two points in the said gold studs in the said brass rod, the brass being at the temperature of 62 of Fahrenheit's thermometer, shall be and is hereby denominated the "Imperial Standard yard...
Page 171 - From the loss of the Kent by fire, in the Bay of Biscay, on the 1st of March, 1825...
Page 212 - ... of the adaptation of the system to blast furnaces, when using coal for smelting iron ores. The object was chiefly to point out what were believed to be the causes of the inferiority of iron, in many works, apart from the varying qualities of the ores. These were stated to be the introduction and application of the hot blast, which had enabled the iron-master to reduce into cast and malleable iron, a very large...
Page 171 - After one or two unsuccessful attempts to place the little frail bark fairly upon the surface of the water, the command was at length given to unhook ; the tackle at the stern was, in consequence, immediately cleared ; but the' ropes at the bow having got foul, the sailor there found it impossible to obey the order. "In vain was the axe applied to the entangled tackle, the moment was inconceivably critical, as the boat, which necessarily followed the motion of the ship, was gradually rising out of...
Page 71 - The use of copper sheathing is to protect the wood from destruction by the worm, and to prevent the adhesion of weeds, barnacles, &c., which impede the sailing of the vessel. On the first introduction of copper, it was used in conjunction with iron bolts and other fastenings ; these soon oxidated, and serious accidents occurred. It was advised, in consequence, that all the bolts should be of copper or mixed metal. The attention of the Government was directed to the subject, and Sir Humphrey Davy...

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