The Youth's instructer [sic] and guardian

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Page 392 - There fragrant flowers, immortal, bloom, And joys supreme are given : There rays divine...
Page 229 - Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath : for it is written, Vengeance is mine ; I will repay, saith the Lord. Therefore, if thine enemy hunger, feed him ; if he thirst, give him drink : for in so doing thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head.
Page 399 - ... the room he was in, he said, he knew to be but part of the house, yet he could not conceive that the whole house could look bigger.
Page 392 - There faith lifts up her cheerful eye, To brighter prospects given; And views the tempest passing by, The evening shadows quickly fly, And all serene in heaven.
Page 354 - Tis here the folly of the wise Through all his art we view ; And, while his tongue the charge denies, His conscience owns it true.
Page 298 - And the king rose up to meet her, and bowed himself unto her, and sat down on his throne, and caused a seat to be set for the king's mother ; and she sat on his right hand.
Page 370 - And the women said unto Naomi, Blessed be the Lord, which hath not left thee this day without a kinsman, that his name may be famous in Israel. And he shall be unto thee a restorer of thy life, and a nourisher of thine old age: for thy daughter in law, which loveth thee, which is better to thee than seven sons, hath borne him.
Page 122 - ... fables. And exercise thyself unto godliness : for bodily exercise is profitable for a little ; but godliness is profitable for all things, having promise of the life which now is, and of that which is to come.
Page 170 - THERE is a land of pure delight, Where saints immortal reign, Infinite day excludes the night, And pleasures banish pain. 2 There everlasting spring abides, And never-withering flowers : Death, like a narrow sea, divides This heavenly land from ours.
Page 398 - ... he could form no judgment of their shape, or guess what it was in any object that was pleasing to him. He knew not the shape of any thing, or any one thing from another, however different in shape or magnitude ; but, upon being told what things were, whose form he before knew from feeling, he would carefully observe, that he might know them again...

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