The Backwoods of Canada: Being Letters from the Wife of an Emigrant Officer, Illustrative of the Domestic Economy of British America

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C. Knight, 1836 - Animals - 351 pages
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User Review  - MaggieFlo - LibraryThing

This is a very interesting and informative memoir of the wife of a British soldier. Mrs Parr Trail writes letters to family and friends back in the UK and describes the voyage across the Atlantic, the ... Read full review

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User Review  - AJBraithwaite - LibraryThing

After reading Susannah Moodie's memoir of settling in Canada and absolutely hating it, I was dubious about committing myself to reading her sister's published letters on the same subject. I need not ... Read full review

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Page 38 - In those days was Hezekiah sick unto death. And the prophet Isaiah the son of Amoz came to him, and said unto him, Thus saith the Lord, Set thine house in order; for thou shalt die, and not live.
Page 274 - Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee : for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God: where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried : the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me.
Page 179 - She is not afraid of the snow for her household: for all her household are clothed with scarlet.
Page 103 - How small of all that human hearts endure, That part which laws or kings can cause or cure! Still to ourselves in every place consign'd, Our own felicity we make or find : * With secret course, which no loud storms annoy, Glides the smooth current of domestic joy.
Page 166 - When ornamented and wrought in patterns with dyed quills, I can assure you they are by no means inelegant. They manufacture vessels of birch-bark so well that they will serve for many useful household purposes, such as holding...
Page 167 - If they have fixed their mind on any one article, they will come to you day after day, refusing any other you may offer to their notice. One of the squaws fell in love with a gay chintz dressing-gown belonging to my husband, and though I resolutely refused to part with it, all the squaws in the wigwam by turns came to " look at gown," which they pronounced with their peculiarly plaintive tone of voice; and when I said "no gown to sell," they uttered a melancholy exclamation of regret, and went away.
Page 168 - If the goods you offer them in exchange for theirs do not answer their expectations, they give a sullen and dogged look or reply, " Car-car" (no, no), or " Carwinni," which is a still more forcible negative. But when the bargain pleases them, they signify their approbation by several affirmative nods of the head, and a note not much unlike a grunt ; the ducks, fish, venison, or baskets, are placed beside you, and the articles of exchange transferred to the folds of their .capacious blankets, or deposited...
Page 162 - God in the wilderness. I was much pleased with the simple piety of our friend the hunter Peter's squaw, a stout, swarthy matron, of most amiable expression. We were taking our tea when she softly opened the door and looked in; an encouraging smile induced her to enter, and depositing a brown papouse (Indian for baby or little child) on the ground, she gazed round with curiosity and delight in her eyes. We offered her some tea and bread, motioning to her to take a vacant seat beside the table. She...
Page 195 - On first coming to this country nothing surprised me more than the total absence of trees about the dwelling-houses and cleared lands; the axe of the chopper relentlessly levels all before him. Man appears to contend with the trees of the forest as though they were his most obnoxious enemies; for he spares neither the young sapling in its greenness nor the ancient trunk in its lofty pride; he wages war against the forest with fire and steel.
Page 6 - The simple truth, founded entirely upon personal knowledge of the facts related, is the basis of the work; to have had recourse to fiction might have rendered it more acceptable to many readers, but would have made it less useful to that class for whom it is intended.

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