A Summer in Brittany, Volume 1

Front Cover
H. Colburn, 1840 - Britons - 410 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 354 - Producing change of beauty ever new. —Ah ! that such beauty, varying in the light Of living nature, cannot be portrayed By words, nor by the pencil's silent skill; But is the property of him alone Who hath beheld it, noted it with care, And in his mind recorded it with love!
Page 103 - Signa te, signa ; temere me tangis et angis ; Roma tibi subito motibus ibit amor.
Page 223 - This little town is built on the side of a hill, at the foot of which runs the Arquenon, which, with the assistance of the tide, brings vessels of seventy tons to the port.
Page 216 - avancée vers la pleine mer, un petit coin de terre, tout juste suffisant « pour contenir mon cercueil ; je le ferai bénir et entourer d'une grille « de fer ; là, quand il plaira à Dieu, je reposerai sous la protection de
Page 323 - I should have thought that female vanity would have effectually prevented such a traffic as this being carried on to any extent. But there seemed to be no difficulty in finding possessors of beautiful heads of hair perfectly willing to sell. We saw several girls sheared one after the other like sheep, and as many more standing ready for the shears, with their caps in their hands, and their long hair combed out and hanging down to their waists. Some of the operators were men and some women. By the...
Page 419 - than to that of Falaise or Domfront. It is no Gaulish hill-fortress which has grown by degrees into a Roman and into a modern city. The town of Mayenne stands on both sides of the river from which it takes its name, a river of far greater width than the maternal beck at Falaise or even than the Varenne at Domfront. It may well be that the light craft of the Northmen, who so long harassed the shores and islands of the Loire and its tributaries, may have made their way even to this inland post. At...
Page 323 - What surprised me more than all, by the singularity and novelty of the thing, were the operations of the dealers in hair. In various parts of the motley crowd there were three or four different purchasers of this commodity, who travel the country for the purpose of attending the fairs and buying the tresses of the peasant girls. They have particularly fine hair, and frequently in the greatest abundance.
Page 192 - ... which is a yellow loam filled with fresh water shells. This great loamy formation, elevated about two hundred and fifty feet above the level of the sea, extends along the right bank (ascending) of the Mississippi River, from the thirty-first degree of north latitude, as far up as Vicksburg...
Page 106 - ... (Norman French) ; but at Bayeux there are plenty who can speak only Danish, and, therefore, Sir count Boton, I wish that you should take him with you, and that you should carefully instruct him." " Se a Roem le faz garder, E norir gaires lungement, II ne sara parler neient Daneis ; kar nul ne 1' i parole. Si voil k'il seit a tele escole, Ke as Daneis sace parler. Se ne sevent neient forz Romanz ; Mez a Baiues en a tanz, Ki ne sevent parler se Daneis non, E pur jo, sire quens Boton, Voil ke vos...
Page 323 - But there seemed to be no difficulty in finding possessors of beautiful heads of hair perfectly willing to sell. "We saw several girls sheared, one after the other, like sheep, and as many more standing ready for the shears, with their caps in their hands, and their long hair combed out, and hanging down to their waists. Some of the operators were men, and some women. By the side of the dealer was placed a large basket, into which every successive crop of hair, tied up into a wisp by itself, was...

Bibliographic information