Contributions to the Edinburgh Review, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 205 - The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the Crown. It may be frail — its roof may shake — the wind may blow through it — the storm may enter — the rain may enter — but the King of England cannot enter ! — all his forces dare not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement...
Page 200 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
Page 204 - ... man, woman, and child ! to send forth the infidel savage — 'against whom ? against your Protestant brethren ; to lay waste their country, to desolate their dwellings, and extirpate their race and name, with these horrible hell-hounds of savage war ! — hell-hounds, I say, of savage war...
Page 94 - Evil into the mind of God or man May come and go, so unapproved, and leave No spot or blame behind...
Page 73 - I have heard them in my youth from a naked savage, in the indignant character of a prince surrounded by his subjects, addressing the governor of a British colony, holding a bundle of sticks in his hand, as the notes of his unlettered eloquence : 'Who is it,' said the jealous ruler over the desert, encroached upon by the restless foot of English adventure — ' who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean? Who is it that causes to blow the loud...
Page 204 - I call upon the honor of your lordships, to reverence the dignity of your ancestors, and to maintain your own. I call upon the spirit and humanity of my country to vindicate the national character.
Page 76 - ... to man beating in the heart, where He alone can look ; — if he finds that our conduct, though often forced out of the path by our infirmities, has been in general well directed ; — his all-searching eye will assuredly never pursue us into those little corners of our lives, much less will his justice select them for punishment, without the general context of our existence, by which faults may be sometimes found to have grown out of virtues, and very many of our heaviest offences to have been...
Page 73 - Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer? Who is it that rears up the shade of these lofty forests and blasts them with the quick lightning at his pleasure? The same Being who gave to you a country on the other side of the waters, and gave ours to us; and by this title we will defend it...
Page 202 - We shall be forced ultimately to retract; let us retract while we can, not when we must. I say we must necessarily undo these violent oppressive acts; they must be repealed — you will repeal them; I pledge myself for it, that you will in the end repeal them ; I stake my reputation on it — I will consent to be taken for an idiot, if they are not finally, repealed.
Page 203 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms — never — never — never.

Bibliographic information