Mabel, Volume 1

Front Cover
Createspace Independent Pub, 1854 - Fiction - 122 pages
One morning, early in the month of August, a few years since, the sun rose lazily and luxuriously over the hills that bounded the little village of Aston, which lay in one of the prettiest valleys of Gloucestershire. The golden beams of that glorious luminary falling first upon the ivy-covered tower of the little church, seemed, to the eye of fancy, to linger with pleasure round the sacred edifice, as if glad to recognize the altar of Him, who, from the beginning, had fixed his daily course through the bright circle of the heavens, then pouring a flood of brilliancy on the simple rectory, danced over the hills, and played with the many windows of the old Manor House, which, situated at a short distance from the church, formed one of the most striking objects of the village.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 203 - The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour which doth in it live. The canker-blooms have full as deep a dye As the perfumed tincture of the roses, Hang on such thorns, and play as wantonly When summer's breath their masked buds discloses: But, for their virtue only is their show, They live unwoo'd and unrespected fade; Die to themselves.
Page 1 - New mercies, each returning day, Hover around us while we pray ; New perils past, new sins forgiven, New thoughts of God, new hopes of heaven.
Page 321 - I wonder not that parents' eyes, In gazing thus, grow cold and dim, That burning tears and aching sighs Are blended with the funeral hymn ; The spirit hath an earthly part, That weeps when earthly pleasure flies, And heaven would scorn the frozen heart That melts not when the infant dies.
Page 292 - ... hopes and views sublime. To her he came to die, and every day She took some portion of the dread away; With him she pray'd, to him his Bible read, Soothed the faint heart, and held the aching head.
Page 19 - They that forsake the law praise the wicked: but such as keep the law contend with them.
Page 217 - The mind's brave ardor in heroic aims, Such as may raise us o'er the grovelling herd, And make us shine for ever — that is life.
Page 133 - Remembered there were paths less fair, And, selfish in my own blest lot, Ne'er strove to soothe another's care. But when the weight of sorrow found My spirit prostrate and resigned, The anguish of the bleeding wound Taught me to feel for all mankind. Even as from the wounded tree The goodly, precious balm will pour ; So in the rived heart there'll be Mercy that never flowed before.
Page 107 - Brothers in blood and nurture too, Aliens in heart so oft should prove ; One lose, the other keep, Heaven's clue ; One dwell in wrath, and one in love.
Page 149 - Is this a Mother's Love ? A parent's heart may prove a snare; The child she loves so well, Her hand may lead, with gentlest care, Down the smooth road to hell ; Nourish its frame, — destroy its mind : Thus do the blind mislead the blind, Even with a Mother's Love.
Page 64 - This let me hope, that when in public view I bring my pictures, men may feel them true ; 'This is a likeness,' may they all declare, 'And I have seen him, but I know not where;' For I should mourn the mischief I had done, If as the likeness all would fix on one.

Bibliographic information