Democracy in the United States: What it Has Done, what it is Doing, and what it Will Do

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D. Appleton, 1868 - United States - 414 pages
 

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Page 314 - ... so far inferior, that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.
Page 14 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none...
Page 410 - To borrow money on the credit of the United States ; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian tribes ; To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the United States ; To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of...
Page 414 - The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so, construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular state. SECTION 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state in this Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion, and on application of the legislature, or of the...
Page 165 - ... it is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union, to your collective and individual happiness...
Page 165 - In contemplating the causes which may disturb our Union, it occurs as a matter of serious concern, that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminations — northern and southern — Atlantic and western ; whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views.
Page 14 - ... the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies; the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 13 - Still one thing more, fellow-citizens — a wise and frugal government which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned.
Page 165 - The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize.
Page 407 - All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives. SECTION 2. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

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