Insect Conservation Biology (Conservation Biology, No 2)

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 1994 - Nature - 358 pages
Insects are the major component of the world's biodiversity. By their vast numbers of both species and individuals, they are vital determinants of the terrestrial ecological processes. Quantitatively, insects are important pointers for the species-rich geographical areas. Qualitatively, they are also important, whether the subjects of conservation themselves or as tools for identifying biotic areas with high endemism.
 

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Contents

Global variation in insect variety
3
11 Insect success
4
12 Insects in ecosystems
8
13 World insect species richness
13
14 Latitudinal gradients in species richness and population variability
16
northern and southern hemispheres
21
16 Insect size plagues and population crashes
23
17 Summary
26
61 Disturbances
134
62 Extinction vortices associated with minimum viable populations
136
63 Natural disturbances and patch dynamics
139
64 From adversity agriculture to agroecology
148
65 Beneficial aspects of the agriculture landscape on insect conversation
155
66 Urbanization and insect conservation
162
67 Summary
165
Individual insect species and their conservation
169

Past and present events leading to insect conservation concern
29
21 Prehistorical insect distribution in temperate lands
30
22 Prehistorical setting in tropical lands
33
23 Historical trends in temperate lands
36
24 Historical trends in tropical lands
40
25 Recent global climate changes
41
26 Summary
45
Emergence of insect conservation biology
47
31 Development of insect conversation concern
48
32 Perspectives on insect conservation
52
33 Insect conservation and planet management
54
from species to ecosystems
56
35 NeoMalthusian and antiMalthusian viewpoints
59
36 Historical reverence for insects
60
37 Emergence of the science of conservation biology
62
who pays for insect conservation?
64
Levels of Analysis
67
Scaling and largescale issues
69
41 Protection of insects and where they live
70
42 Global matters
77
43 Ecosystem changes
81
44 Effects on specific ecosystems and biotopes
84
45 Nature reserves and global warming
96
46 Insect migrations and rooting sites
98
47 Summary
100
The fragmented landscape
103
51 Landscape ecology
104
52 Matrices
105
53 Patches
107
54 Corridors
114
55 Edges and ecotones
122
56 Toposcape
127
57 Summary
129
The disturbed landscape
133
71 Rarity
170
72 The taxonomic impediment
174
73 Official categories of threat
176
74 The Red List and Red Data Books
179
75 Distributional records
182
76 Summary
192
Entomologists Dilemmas
195
Insect pest control and insect conservation
197
81 Biotic contamination by animals
198
82 Pesticides
201
83 Classical biological control realistic advantages
203
84 Biological control disadvantages
205
85 Resolving conflicts
210
87 Summary
215
Insect conservation ethics
219
91 Value of the individual insect and the species
220
92 Insect utilitarian value
223
93 Value of the landscape
226
94 Summary
230
Insects the landscape and evaluation
235
101 Evaluation to action
236
102 Taxonomic indicator groups
248
103 Indicator species species lists and lifehistory styles
252
104 Diversity measurement
254
105 Summary
271
Stopping the loss of individuals populations species and landscapes
275
111 Restoration ecology
276
112 Breeding programmes and preservation technology
287
113 Sustainable conservation
291
114 Summary
292
References
295
Index
331
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