Elements of Natural History: Invertebrata, &c

Front Cover
Adam Black and John Stark, 1828 - Natural history
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 122 - ... when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string : next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and, as it groweth greater, it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth, and hangeth onely by the bill : in short space after it commeth to full maturitie, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers, and groweth to a fowle bigger than a mallard, and lesser than a goose...
Page 122 - Muskles are; the other end is made fast into the belly of a rude masse or lumpe, which in time commeth to the shape and form of a bird: when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string; next come the legs of the bird...
Page 122 - Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, and also the trunks and bodies, with the branches of old and rotten trees, cast up there likewise, whereon is found a certain spume or froth, that in time breedeth...
Page 242 - To the eye of the naturalist," says Latreille, '" the mass or volume of an object is a matter of little consequence. The wisdom of the CREATOR never appears more conspicuous than in the structure of those minute beings which seem to conceal themselves from observation ; and Almighty Power is never more strikingly exhibited than in the concentration of organs in such an atom. In giving life to this atom, and constructing in dimensions •so minute so many organs susceptible of different sensations,...
Page 234 - They fix themselves by their claws in a vertical position upon some object; withdraw every part of the body, even the legs and wings, from a thin pellicle which...
Page 234 - These parts are gradually unfolded, and take their destined forms. The elytra assume their brilliant colours; the wings expand to their proper size, and assume their various markings; and what seemed, a few minutes before, but an inanimate half-formed mass, is transformed into an animal decked with the most vivid colours, and rejoicing in its new existence. The operation of expanding their wings, in by far the greater number of insects, occupies only a few minutes; in some Butterflies half an hour,...
Page 235 - ... ligniperda) is three years, and that of the Cabbage Butterfly not three months, in attaining maturity, yet the perfect insect, in both species, lives equally long. The Melolontha vulgaris, which exists four years in its preparatory stages, lives only eight or ten days as a perfect insect. Some Ephemerae, whose larvae have enjoyed two years of preparatory existence, scarcely live beyond an hour; while the common Flesh-fly, whose larvae attain to maturity in three or four days, exists several weeks.
Page 363 - Silk-worm in reeds, for the first time, to Constantinople. The cultivation of this useful animal was thus extended to Southern Europe; and was, afterwards, introduced into Spain and Africa by the Arabs. In the time of the Crusaders, the insect passed from the Morea into Sicily and Calabria. From Calabria, the mulberry and the ova of the same animal, were brought to France by some of the followers of Charles the Eighth, on his conquest of Naples; and the cultivation of the insect was afterwards encouraged...
Page 354 - Apiariae of temperate climates, the pupae do not undergo their last transformation till the following year. The societies of Bees include three kinds of individuals: — the workers, or neuters, forming the greater portion of the population ; the males, or drones, in limited number; and the females, of which there is generally but one in each, known by the name of the Queen Bee. The workers and the females are armed with a sting; and Mr. Huber, junior, has remarked a difference among the workers;...
Page 349 - They occupy themselves in the construction of the dwelling, and in feeding the larvae. The female continues to deposit her ova; the family increases in number; the envelope of the comb is enlarged; and, when completed, other pillars are formed, connected with the first, until the whole cavity is filled, except an entrance about an inch in diameter. Towards the beginning of autumn, the young males and females acquire their perfect form ; and all the larvae which have not gone through their transformation...

Bibliographic information