Carlyles' Works: Oliver Cromwell's letters and speeches

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Page 348 - And he shall be for a sanctuary ; but for a stone of stumbling and for a rock of offence to both the houses of Israel, for a gin and for a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem. And many among them shall stumble, and fall, and be broken, and be snared, and be taken.
Page 307 - Turn you at my reproof: behold, I will pour out my Spirit unto you, I will make known my words unto you.
Page 230 - They have mouths, but they speak not: eyes have they, but they see not: They have ears, but they hear not: noses have they, but they smell not...
Page 230 - NOT unto us, O Lord, not unto us, But unto thy name give glory, For thy mercy, and for thy truth's sake.
Page 506 - And, behold, one of the children of Israel came and brought unto his brethren a Midianitish woman in the sight of Moses, and in the sight of all the congregation of the children of Israel, who were weeping before the door of the tabernacle of the congregation.
Page 404 - Parliament, and by the authority of the same, that the people of England, and of all the dominions and territories thereunto belonging, are and shall be, and are hereby constituted, made, established, and confirmed, to be a Commonwealth and Free State, and shall from henceforth be governed as a Commonwealth and Free State...
Page 51 - Ages. ; this is the element which stamps them as Heroic, and has rendered their works great, manlike, fruitful to all generations. It is by far the memorablest achievement of our Species ; without that element, in some form or other, nothing of Heroic had ever been among us. For many centuries, Catholic Christianity, a fit embodiment of that divine Sense, had been current more or less, making the generations noble : and here in England, in the Century called the Seventeenth, we see the last aspect...
Page 108 - I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side...
Page 183 - Sir, you know my own trials this way : 1 but the Lord supported me with this, That the Lord took him into the happiness we all pant for and live for.
Page 192 - For what do the Enemy say ? Nay, what do many say that were friends at the beginning of the Parliament ? Even this, That the Members of both Houses have got great places and commands, and the sword into their hands ; and, what by interest in Parliament...

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