Memoir, Extracts of Speeches, Diary of Journey to America, &c

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D. Green, 1866 - Archdeacons - 294 pages
 

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Page 210 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups, That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 149 - Thus then to man the voice of nature spake, ' Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field ; Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plow, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 175 - To conclude therefore, let no man, upon a weak conceit of sobriety or an ill-applied moderation, think or maintain that a man can search too far or be too well studied in the book of God's word or in the book of God's works ; divinity or philosophy ; but rather let men endeavour an endless progress or proficience in both...
Page 170 - Like the vase in which roses have once been distilled — You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will, But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.
Page 202 - ... next came the queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic ; her face oblong, fair, but wrinkled ; her eyes small, yet black and pleasant; her nose a little hooked; her lips narrow; and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 113 - The rich and the poor meet together: The Lord is the maker of them all.
Page 229 - I bear them) so without measure misordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr Elmer ; who teacheth me so gently, so pleasantly, with such fair allurements to learning, that I think all the time nothing whiles I am •with him. And when I am called from him, I fall on weeping, because whatsoever I do else but learning, is full of grief, trouble, fear, and whole misliking unto me.
Page 207 - Sing a song of sixpence, A pocket full of rye; Four and twenty blackbirds Baked in a pie. When the pie was opened, The birds began to sing; Was not that a dainty dish To set before the king!
Page 202 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads. Her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 203 - The ladies of the court followed next to her, very handsome and well shaped, and for the most part dressed in white. She was guarded on each side by the gentlemen pensioners, fifty in number, with gilt battle-axes. In the ante-chapel, next the hall where we were, petitions were presented to her, and she received them most graciously which occasioned the acclamation of ' Long Live Queen Elizabeth ! ' She answered it with

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