The description of Greece, by Pausanias, tr. with notes [by T. Taylor].

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Page 234 - The Pleiads, Hyads, with the northern team; And great Orion's more refulgent beam; To which, around the axle of the sky, The Bear, revolving, points his golden eye, Still shines exalted on th' ethereal plain, Nor bathes his blazing forehead in the main.
Page 207 - The globe, and whose dread earthquakes heave the ground.' The prudent chief with calm attention heard ; Then mildly thus : ' Excuse, if youth have err'd ; ' Superior as thou art, forgive th' offence, ' Nor I thy equal, or in years, or sense.
Page 96 - They farther report, that in consequence of the city being freed through Euthymus from this grievous calamity, his nuptials were celebrated in a very splendid manner. I have likewise heard still farther concerning this Euthymus, that he lived to extreme old age, and that having avoided death, he departed after some other manner from an association with mankind. Indeed, I have even heard it asserted, by a seafaring merchant, that Euthymus is alive at present at Temessa, and such are the reports which...
Page 204 - Rash as thou art to prop the Trojan throne, (Forgetful of my wrongs, and of thy own,) And guard the race of proud Laomedon! Hast thou forgot, how, at the monarch's prayer, We shared the lengthen'd labours of a year? Troy walls I raised (for such were Jove's commands), And yon...
Page 224 - The meaning of this is, that the success of men in love-affairs depends more on the assistance of Fortune than the charms of beauty. I am persuaded, too, with Pindar (to whose opinion I submit in other particulars), that Fortune is one of the Fates, and that in a certain respect she is more powerful than her sisters.
Page 311 - Thebes," recently discovered by the author, representing the Solar Disc with arms and hands pouring down from a midday ring. from this city men learnt how to build other cities. But on the left hand of the Temple of Despoina is the mountain Lycaeum, which they call Olympus ; and by others of the Arcadians it is denominated the sacred summit. They say that Jupiter was educated on this mountain ; and there is a place in the mountain which is called Cretea, and which is on the left of the grove...
Page 232 - At present, however, when vice has spread itself through every part of the earth, the divine nature is no longer produced out of the human, or, in other words, men are no longer gods, but are only dignified with the appellation, through immoderate flattery; and in consequence of their unjust conduct while living on the earth they experience the wrath of divinity when they depart from hence. Indeed, in all ages, as many things happened in a more early period...
Page 96 - Temessa at the time in which they sacrificed after the usual manner to the daemon, having learned the particulars of this affair, requested that he might be admitted within the temple, and behold the virgin. His request being granted, as soon as he saw her he was at first moved with pity for her condition, but afterwards fell in love with her. In consequence of this, the virgin swore that she would cohabit with him, if he could rescue her from the impending death : and Euthymus arming himself, fought...
Page 344 - Sumbola, and merges itself in the Tegeatic land. Ascending from hence in Asaea, and mingling itself with the water of Eurotas, it falls a second time into the earth, emerges from hence, in that place which the Arcadians call the fountains, and running through the Pisaean and Olympian plains, pours itself into the sea above Cyllene, which is a haven of .the Eleans.
Page 208 - ... sun. The Japanese precious stone, MAGA-TAMA, is also an emblem of the spirit of woman. The Japanese temple of Isa-Naga, or the source symboled by the serpent, contained no image but one vast mirror or symbolic eye. In the temple of Neptune, says Pausanias, they let down a mirror which is suspended and balanced in such a manner that it may not be merged in the fountain with its anterior part, but so that the water may lightly touch its circumference. That was the mirror above and mirror below....

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