Parbury's oriental herald and colonial intelligencer

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Page 101 - Governor-General has been led to these measures by the duty which is imposed upon him of providing for the security of the possessions of the British Crown...
Page 289 - We know that India cannot have a free Government. But she may have the next best thing, — a firm and impartial despotism.
Page 528 - ... of traffic (which he heartily hopes has ceased for ever) the Chief Superintendent will once more declare his own opinion, that in its general effects, it was intensely mischievous to every branch of the trade ; that it was rapidly staining the British character with deep disgrace ; and, finally, that it exposed the vast public and private interests involved in the peaceful maintenance of our regular commercial intercourse with this empire, to imminent jeopardy.
Page 102 - Singh, be the channel of submitting to the consideration of his Highness; that he avowed schemes of aggrandizement and ambition, injurious to the security and peace of the frontiers of India...
Page 192 - East India Company's Envoy at the Court of Persia, to acquaint you, for the information of the Right Hon. the GovernorGeneral of India in Council, that his Majesty the Shah of Persia yesterday raised the siege of this city, and with the whole of the royal camp marched to Sangbust, about twelve miles, on his return to his own dominions. His Majesty proceeds without delay, by Torrbut Sheki Jaum and Meshid, to Teheran.
Page 4 - The regiment that is now stationed at her furthest frontier post on the western shore of the Caspian, has as great a distance to march back to Moscow as onward to Attock on the Indus, and is actually further from St. Petersburgh than from Lahore, the capital of the Seiks.
Page 613 - Provided also, that it shall be lawful for all men, as well in churches, chapels, oratories, or other places, to use openly any psalm or prayer taken out of the Bible, at any due time, not letting or omitting thereby the service or any part thereof mentioned in the said book.
Page 102 - ... of commerce, and to gain for the British nation in Central Asia that legitimate influence which an interchange of benefits would naturally produce.
Page 101 - Soojah-ool-Moolk, whereby His Highness is guaranteed in his present possessions, and has bound himself to co-operate for the restoration of the Shah to the throne of his ancestors. The friends and enemies of any one of the contracting...
Page 102 - Maharajah would not be slow to avenge this aggression ; and it was to be feared that the flames of war being once kindled in the very regions into which we were endeavouring to extend our commerce, the peaceful and beneficial purposes of the British government would be altogether frustrated.

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