Antislavery Recollections: In a Series of Letters Addressed to Mrs. Beecher Stowe

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Page 57 - That, through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate, enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of His Majesty's subjects.
Page 57 - That through a determined and persevering, but at the same time judicious and temperate enforcement of such measures, this House looks forward to a progressive improvement in the character of the slave population, such as may prepare them for a participation in those civil rights and privileges which are enjoyed by other classes of his Majesty's subjects.
Page 67 - It is matter of pride to me to recollect that, whilst economists and politicians were recommending to the Legislature the protection of this traffic, and senators were framing statutes for its promotion, and declaring it a benefit to the country, the judges of the land, above the age in which they lived, standing upon the high ground of natural right, and disdaining to bend to the lower doctrine of expediency, declared that slavery was inconsistent with the genius of the English constitution, and...
Page 66 - Slavery is a relation which has always, in British courts, been held inconsistent with the constitution of the country. It is matter of pride to me to recollect, that while economists and politicians were recommending to the legislature the protection of this traffic, and senators were framing statutes for its promotion, and declaring it a benefit to the country, the judges of the land, above the age in which they lived, standing upon the high ground of natural right, and disdaining to bend to the...
Page 67 - I do not, therefore, feel myself fettered by any thing expressed in either of them, in pronouncing the same opinion upon the rights growing out of slavery, as if they had never passed. If, indeed, there had been any express law, commanding us to recognise those rights, we might then have been called upon to consider the propriety of that which has been said by the great commentator upon the laws of this country, "That if any human law should allow or injoin us to commit an offence against the divine...
Page 161 - ... established, and are therefore called natural rights, such as are life and liberty, need not the aid of human laws to be more effectually invested in every man than they are ; neither do they receive any additional strength when declared by the municipal laws to be inviolable. On the contrary, no human legislature has power to abridge or destroy them, unless the owner shall himself commit some act that amounts to a forfeiture.
Page 117 - We soon became the buglemen of the mighty host, nor did we rest, or allow others to rest, till Wilberforce rose to put the amendment, which was carried with a burst of exulting triumph that would have made the Falls of Niagara inaudible at equal distance.
Page 67 - Upon these two foundations, the law of nature, and the law of revelation, depend all human laws ; that is to say, no human law should be suffered to contradict these.
Page 117 - That from and after the 1st of January, 1830, every slave born within the King's dominions shall be free." It was a spark to the mine! the shouts, the tumult of applause were such as I never heard before, and never shall hear again. Cheers innumerable thundered from every bench, hats and handkerchiefs were waved in every hand. Buxton deprecated, Brougham interposed, Wilberforce waved his hand for silence, but all was pantomime and dumb show. I did my best in a little knot of some half-dozen young...
Page 13 - ... held down, and his body laid bare from the back downwards. The lash is then applied vertically, by the driver or executioner, who stands at the proper distance to make the sufferer feel the full power of his torturing instrument. The report of the lash is louder than that of the long whalebone whips of our London carmen ; and its effect so severe (except when the drivers are humanely forbid to cut, as the phrase is), that blood is drawn, and the skin stripped...

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