The History, Ancient and Modern, of the Sheriffdoms of Fife and Kinross: With the Description of Both, and of the Firths of Forth and Tay, and the Islands in Them ... with an Account of the Natural Products of the Land and Waters

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R. Tullis, 1803 - Fife (Scotland) - 468 pages
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Page 138 - Muskles are; the other end is made fast into the belly of a rude masse or lumpe, which in time commeth to the shape and form of a bird: when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string; next come the legs of the bird hanging...
Page 138 - ... when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open. and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and as it groweth greater it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth and hangeth. only by the bill. In short space after it cometh to full maturity, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers and groweth to a fowl, bigger than a mallard, and lesser than a goose...
Page 138 - ... falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers, and groweth to a fowle bigger than a Mallard, and lesser than a Goose, having blacke legs and bill or beake, and feathers blacke and white...
Page 138 - Martlninut, have seen, and our hands touched, we shall declare. There is a small island in Lancashire called the Pile of Foulders, wherein are found the broken pieces of old and bruised ships, some whereof have been cast thither by shipwracke, and also the trunks and bodies with the branches of old and rotten trees...
Page 333 - He had with him his clothes and bedding, with a firelock, some powder, bullets, and tobacco, a hatchet, a knife, a kettle, a Bible, some practical pieces, and his mathematical instruments and books. He diverted and provided for himself as well as he could, but for the first eight months had much ado to bear up against melancholy, and the terror of being left alone in such a desolate place.
Page 138 - Lancashire call by no other name than a tree goose, which place aforesaid, and all those parts adjoining, do so much abound therewith, that one of the best is bought for threepence. For the truth hereof, if any doubt, may it please them to repair unto me, and I shall satisfie them by the testimonie of good witnesses*.
Page 75 - WILLIAM, by the grace of God, king of the English, and duke of the Normans, to all his subjects of France and England, greeting.— Law li.
Page 332 - These, my lads, are the foes who expect to convey us in bonds to the English king ; but by your courage, and the help of God, they shall fail. Set yourselves in order, every man to his station. Charge, gunners ; let the crossbows be ready ; have the lime-pots and fire-balls to the tops ; two-handed swordi to the fore-rooms. Be stout, be diligent, for your own sakes, and for the honour of this realm.
Page 221 - And leave their houses, and their household stuff ; Here they shall find for their refuge a place ; To save them from the cruel blood avenger ; A privilege peculiar to that race. Which never was allowed to any stranger. But they must enter heir, on this condition, (Which they observe must with a faith unfeignzied) To pay a thousand groats for their remission, Or else their lands and goods shall be distrenzied.
Page 332 - ... alternate hopes and fears. During the night the combatants lay by to refresh and refit. At the dawn of day the trumpets again summoned them to arms. The battle continued so obstinate that the neglected vessels drove before an ebb-tide and south wind, till they were opposite the mouth of the Tay. At length the valour and seamanship of Wood prevailed ; the three English ships were captured and brought to Dundee, where the wounded were properly tended. Wood presented Bull to the Scottish monarch,...

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