CHOICE SPECIMENS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE

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Contents

CHAPTER VI
104
Shakspeare 15641616
108
Wolsey and Cromwell
114
Macbeths Irresolution before the Murder
120
CHAPTER IX
136
165S
142
William Chillingworth 1602
149
CHAPTER XI
161
CHAPTER XII
182
Algernon Sidney 16211684
195
The Second Revolution
207
CHAPTER XIV
218
Joseph Addison 16721719
232
Sir William Temple 1628
238
Daniel Defoe 16611731
244
The Soldiers Return
251
Historical Moral Political and Theological Writers of the Eighteenth Century Isaac Watts 16741728
254
David Hume 17111776
255
On the Middle Station of Life
257
William Robertson 17211793
258
Edward Gibbon 17371794
259
Charlemagne
260
Mahomet
261
Invention and Use of Gunpowder
263
Samuel Johnson 17091784
264
From the Preface to his Dictionary 212 The Right Improvement of Time
265
Dryden and Pope
267
Reflections on Landing at Iona 215 The Fate of Poverty
269
Charles XII
270
Edmund Burke 17311797
272
Close of his Speech to the Electors of Bristol
273
Marie Antoinette Queen of France 221 From the Impeachment of Warren Hastings
274
From A Letter to a Noble Lord Duke of Bedford
276
The Letters of Junius 1769
277
Adam Smith 17231790
279
William Palev 17431805
280
CHAPTER XVIII
282
James Thomson 17001748
283
From The Castle of Indolence
284
William Shenstone 17141763
285
William Collins 17211759
286
Mark Akenside 17211770
287
Thomas Gray 17161771
288
On a Dis ant Prospect of Eton College 235 The Progress of Poesy
293
William Cowper 17311800
295
Mercy to Animals 238 Pleasures of a Winter Evening
298
The PlayPlace of Early Days 240 The Diverting History of John Gilpin
300
William Falconer 17301769
307
James Macpherson 17381796
308
Thomas Chatterton 1752
310
George Crabbe 17541832
311
An English Peasant
314
Robert Burns 17591796
315
John Anderson 249 Bannockburn
316
The Banks o Doon 251 The Cotters Saturday Night
317
John Wolcott 17381819
322
Richard Brinslej Sheridan 17511816 315 322
323
Rome 266 The Gladiator
340
The Ocean
341
Modern Greece
342
The Flight of the Giaour
343
The Crime of the East 271 A Ship in full Sail 272 Remorse
345
From The Prisoner of Chillon 274 Manfreds Soliloquy on the Jungfrau
346
The Coliseum
348
The Isles of Greece
349
Armenia
350
Thomas Moore 17791852
351
Tis the Last Rose of Summer 280 Forget not the Field
355
28L Those Evening Bells 282 The Turf shall be my Fragrant Shrine
356
Percy Bysshe Shelley 1792
357
Returning Spring
358
The Plain of Lombardy
359
John Keats 17961821
360
From Hvperion 288 Ode on a Grecian
362
Moonlight Thomas Campbell 17771844
363
The Soldiers Dream
364
Ye Mariners of England
365
Hohenlinden
366
CHAPTER XXI
368
William Wordsworth 1770
369
To a Skylark 297 Portrait
372
Milton
373
We are Seven
374
Criticism of Poetry
375
Samuel Taylor Coleridge 17721834 377 301 Genevieve
377
Hymn before Sunrise in the Vale ot Chamouni
378
Kubla Khan or a Vision m a Dream 304 A Calm on the Equator
381
The Phantom Ship
382
Truth
384
Advantage of Method
385
Robert Southey i774I843
389
From the Life of Nelson
391
Samuel Rogers 17631855
393
Rev Charles Wolfe 17911823
395
James Montgomery 17711854
396
Horace Smith 17801849
397
George Canning 17701827
399
John Wilson 17851854
401
John Gibson Lockhart 1794
402
Robert Pollok 17901827
403
Felicia Dorothea Hemans I793I83S 321 The Treasures of the Deep
404
Thomas Hood 17981845
405
The DeathBed
407
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 1861
408
CHAPTER XXII
411
William Cowper 17311800
412
Thomas de Quincey 1785
415
Opium Dreams
416
Sydney Smith 17711845 m
418
Charles Lamb 17751834
425
Henry Hallam 17771859
431
CHAPTER XXIII
442
Edward Lord Thurlow 1732
450
Henry Grattan 17501820
457

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Page 165 - Haste thee, nymph, and bring with thee Jest, and youthful Jollity, Quips, and cranks,* and wanton* wiles, Nods, and becks, and wreathed smiles, Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek; Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides.
Page 109 - Tis mightiest in the mightiest ; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown. His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The attribute to awe and majesty, Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings ; But mercy is above this sceptred sway : It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, It is an attribute to God himself, And earthly power doth then show likest God's, When mercy seasons justice.
Page 342 - Unchangeable, save to thy wild waves' play — Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow — Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now. Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form Glasses itself in tempests ; in all time, Calm or convulsed — in breeze, or gale, or storm, Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime...
Page 143 - Go, lovely rose, Tell her that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young And shuns to have her graces spied, That hadst thou sprung In deserts where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired: Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die, that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee; How small...
Page 373 - Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour: England hath need of thee: she is a fen Of stagnant waters: altar, sword, and pen, Fireside, the heroic wealth of hall and bower, Have forfeited their ancient English dower Of inward happiness. We are selfish men. Oh! raise us up, return to us again; And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power.
Page 373 - A countenance in which did meet Sweet records, promises as sweet ; A creature not too bright or good For human nature's daily food ; For transient sorrows, simple wiles, Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles.
Page 341 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore, There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep Sea, and music in its roar: I love not Man the less, but Nature more...
Page 93 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested: that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books : else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things.
Page 380 - IN Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree : Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round : And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.
Page 110 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.

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