Camp and quarters, scenes and impressions of military life, Volume 1

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Page 76 - The brave man is not he who feels no fear, . For that were stupid and irrational, But he, whose noble soul its fear subdues, And bravely dares the danger nature shrinks from.
Page 132 - As the vine, which has long twined its graceful foliage about the oak, and been lifted by it into sunshine, will, when the hardy plant is rifted by...
Page 287 - Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on.
Page 131 - The guard apprehensive of treachery, and punctilious to his orders, threatened to fire into the boat if it stirred before day-light. Her anxiety and sufferings were thus protracted, through seven or eight dark and cold hours; and her reflections upon that first reception could not give her very encouraging ideas of the treatment she was afterwards to expect. But it is due to justice...
Page 132 - Providence, that woman, who is the mere dependent and ornament of man in his happier hours, should be his stay and solace when smitten with sudden calamity; winding herself into the rugged recesses of his nature, tenderly supporting the drooping head, and binding up the broken heart. I was once congratulating a friend, who had around him a blooming family, knit together in the strongest affection. " I can wish you no better lot," said he, with enthusiasm, " than to have a wife and children.
Page 130 - Serjeant of grenadiers, with great hazard of suffocation, dragged out the first person he caught hold of. It proved to be the Major. It happened...
Page 130 - The day after the conquest of that place he was badly wounded, and she crossed Lake Champlain to join him." " As soon as he recovered, Lady Harriet proceeded to follow his fortunes through the campaign. Major Ackland, her...
Page 129 - Ackland had accompanied her husband to Canada, in the beginning of the year 1776. In the course of that campaign, she traversed a vast space of country, in different extremities of the...
Page 307 - ... had to maintain several conflicts with the English troops. On retreating through Pombal, the moment the English entered the town, the bells were ordered to be rung, and every kind of rejoicing to be made, even it is said, to the burning of Ney and Massena in effigy.
Page 307 - Massena in effigy. Ney, being made acquainted with the fact, instantly turned round, and drove the British out at the point of the bayonet, and set fire to the town. He then wrote a letter to Lord Wellington, stating that he was sorry to have been compelled to such a measure...

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